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Blurring the boundaries between technology and the individual – Exclusive interview with Shoeg.

Par Hayley Cantor







After seeing Shoeg’s project Infiltrate at LEV Matadero, we decided to catch up with him in Barcelona to find out more about his work, and to try and decipher the fascinating performance we saw that intrigued us to discover what technologies he uses to create his live AV shows.

Primarily I understand, you would consider yourself to be a musician, am I right? Or how would you label yourself? When did you decide to experiment with the A/V side of your show?

In the last years I’ve changed that way of seeing myself, so I would say I’m an artist. It’s not only sound anymore, I feel really that I am trying to express myself also through my code, my visual stuff, even my movements. I’m also collaborating with dance companies, where it is quite important to know how you move on stage, and this made me aware of that. So, for example I try to play without the table and computer blocking the visual line to the audience. I have also changed my relationship with sound, focusing more on textured layers instead of pitch.  

I started as a “musician”, but my visual side has been always there. I’ve been working for 15 years as a video editor, and I always had this fascination about image and sound synchronicity and feedback. 

Shoeg - Oudeis
Image from Shoeg’s project – Oudeis

Have you created the visual part of the show yourself or collaborated with a visual artist? (If so, who and why?) If not, tell us about how you developed the project and any challenges you faced in dealing with both elements of the performance.

I almost always create my own stuff. I’m not closed to collaborating with other people, but I tried to involve other artists in the past and for a reason it almost never happened, except for when I worked at the very beginning on the project with Ana Drucker, but after that I spent 2-3 years without a visual show, and I was really missing it. At some point, I wanted it back and I decided I had to refresh my coding knowledge to achieve what I wanted. I studied Computer Science for a couple of years, so at least I had a starting point – more or less.

I wanted to build a real time reactive visual system, that could be completely autonomous in a live set. The idea was to set up a bunch of rules, and do something sound reactive that could last 45 minutes in a live set without getting boring. So first challenge in this process was choosing which tools suited my needs the better. I tried, for example, Open Frameworks, which was a bit too complicated for my coding skills. Later, I knew about game engines like Unreal or Unity, which are free and you can do a lot of things scripting, easier to code. It’s also great to have this good amount of documentation and works done by other people online. I’m curious now about what Touch Designer can do, but for the moment Unity allows me to have a precise control of what I need. 

Shoeg - skin
Image from Shoeg’s project – Container

On the other hand, I wanted to work with objects from the real world in 3D aesthetics. I could model them with Blender, but I have no idea. So I learned some 3D techniques, like photogrammetry or 3D scanning. I remember wanting something more “perfect”, but discovered almost by accident the beautiful imperfections this techniques introduce in the models.

We recently saw your performance of your latest project ‘Infiltrate’ at LEV Matadero. What tools and set up are you using for the show? 

All the sound was generated using a couple of Etee sensors that the guys at Tangi0 lent me for a couple of months. These devices capture my hand and finger motion, as well as pressure data, and that is converted into MIDI signal through a Max MSP patch. Finally, MIDI is sent to the Virus and Digitakt. I had to bring hardware synths to the live sets, because I need a lot of polyphony to build these big layers of sound, and I couldn’t achieve it in virtual synths. Then, the visual stuff is a Unity app reacts to the sound mix. 

Infiltrate - LEV Matadero
Infiltrate at LEV Matadero, photo by Hayley Cantor

How does the use of this technology improve, or add to the quality and experience of your show for you, as an artist?

It allows to express myself in ways I could’ve never imagined. I’ve never performed as comfortable and with wide palette of possibilities with an instrument until I discovered motion sensors combined with the computer. The ability to map any behaviour to any response allows you to optimize your abilities in order to get what you want. This can’t ever happen with “traditional” instruments, you have to adapt to the instrument rigidness and background. I also see the coding process as a prosthesis, an extension able to repeat mechanical operations while you pierce through them.

What does the future hold for Shoeg in the world of live performance?

In the near future, I have to improve a lot of things: I want to make my hands more prominent on stage and be less computer dependent. People keep asking what is happening with the sensors, and I want to make it a bit more understandable. I also have this long list of ideas to code which don’t have time to make, and I would also like to collaborate with other people. But before that, I want to record a new album. I hope I’ll be able to work on it in the next months. 

You can find out more about Shoeg’s work through his artist page.

The post Blurring the boundaries between technology and the individual – Exclusive interview with Shoeg. appeared first on Audiovisualcity.

MIRA FESTIVAL 2019

Par Marta Minguell

The past week, 5th – 9th November, MIRA FESTIVAL celebrated its 9th Edition and Audiovisual City were present to enjoy the program that featured audiovisual shows, 360-degree experiences in DOME format, installations, workshops and conferences.

This edition rethought the combination of art and technology as tools of protest, to turn thinking into action, and invited us to interfere in a personal transformation to trigger a change in the future. In addition to this ingenious theme, the festival opened a new stage at Fabra i Coats, dedicated to multidimensional sound: the 3D Sound Room by Estrella Galicia.

For the live AV shows, we want to highlight some well-known artists that MIRA festival brought this year. Thursday Sam Shepert (AKA Floating Points) played accompanied by the visuals of Hammill Industries. Friday’s Av highlight was CLARK feat. Evelyn Bencicova and her show of a wide gamma of textures along with his characteristic techno. Alessandro Cortini also produced some emotional content through electronic sounds, with his warm and human visuals. On Saturday Biosphere performed a series of recordings and improvisations captured outdoors on the island of Senja, and Vessel and Pedro Maia presented the dualities of the human condition. But these are just some of the many artists who participated in this edition.

Some of the artists that surprised us at Audiovisual City were, on Friday, the Nihiloxica band, with their intercultural experiment, fusing the indigenous Bugandina percussion with dark European club music. Also, on Saturday, the duet of 700 Bliss, with who you clearly see a relationship with the theme of the festival, sounds and words are embodied in suffering and social alignment in an unfair world. And finally, Curl, on Saturday, where we could see an unexpected turn in the style of the band, showing a previous experimental work. The originality and strength of these artists left us astonished.

We show you some of the magical moments that we captured at the festival.

Main Stage
Robert Lippok and Lucas Gutierrez present Non-Face (DOME)
Robert Lippok and Lucas Gutierrez present Non-Face (DOME)
700 Bliss (Live AV)
700 Bliss (Live AV)
Curl (Live AV)
Curl (Live AV)
Rally (Live AV)
Rally (Live AV)
Beatrice Dillon (Live)
Beatrice Dillon (Live)
Biosphere (Live AV)
DOME
Floating Points (Live AV)
Dualismo, Carlos Saez
Dualismo, Carlos Saez
Dualismo, Carlos Saez
Dualismo, Carlos Saez
Curl (Live AV)
Alessandro Cortini (Live AV)
BREACH ACT I, Rick Farin
BREACH ACT I, Rick Farin
BREACH ACT I, Rick Farin

MIRA Festival

Barcelona, Spain

info@mirafestival.com

LINK BOX

Mira Festival

See on the map

The post MIRA FESTIVAL 2019 appeared first on Audiovisualcity.

Nina Verhagen

Par Nina Verhagen

film-aestheticNina Verhagen a twenty-one-year-old translating student. I’m a writer and a film enthusiast.

Fascinated by music, video, photo, and film- I dive into everything regarding audiovisual that interests me or sparks my interest. Same thing.

Social media is amazingit is a way to connect and speak to people all over the world. One image can go through so many countries. It’s fascinating!

The post Nina Verhagen appeared first on Audiovisualcity.

Marta Verde on her live A/V show with Tensal, at LEV Matadero

Par Hayley Cantor




Earlier this month, we met with Marta Verde to find out about her performance with Tensal at LEV Matadero, and to pick her brains about all those niggling little questions we had after following her career for the last few years.

Who are the artists that you are most looking forward to seeing at LEV Matadero?

Myriam Bleau and Ryoichi Kurokawa.

How were you contacted about the project at LEV Festival?

They called me and proposed that I collaborate with Tensal for their edition at Matadero in Madrid. I had never worked with him before.

Do you ever find that some genres of music just don’t inspire your work?

Absolutely. In general I don’t work on the clubbing, or nightlife scene, so related styles of music wouldn’t be my first choice of project. I actually started doing visuals with traditional Galician music.

Analog waves in the Nave at LEV Matadero
Analog waves at ‘la Nave,’ LEV Matadero, Madrid

Do friends often come to see your performances?

Yes, it depends on the performance. These days they tend to film me in vertical, so I rarely have content that I can use other than for Instagram [she laughs]

How do you feel about being on stage as a visual artist?

I don’t really like that part at all, but of course it’s part of the job. I’m quit shy, really. My show at LEV Matadero is quite different from what I usually do – in terms of music genre, as well as the time of the performance – pretty late, since I’m on at 1am.

What is the most unusual project are you’ve worked on in your career so far?

A few years ago I worked on a project with a musician called Julián Elvira who built a flute that played different frequencies (I had no idea that this wasn’t already the case with flutes!) It was really interesting, because I learnt a lot about music and we were able to work very closely together for the collaboration. We premiered the show in Martin E. Segal Theatre, New York.

Marta verde and Tensal at LEv Matadero
Lights and visuals, Marta Verde’s live performance at LEV Matadero with Tensal

What are you working on at the moment?

Right now, I’m working on a live performance with Madrid-based composer, José Venditti. He plays saxophone, and works on deconstructing sound through classical patterns.

What set-up will you be using for your performance tonight?

A couple of months ago I bought an analogue video synthesizer from LZX Industries. It’s really fun. There’s no preview, so anything can happen, and I also can’t save any presets. I also won’t be using any code for this show, which is very unusual for me. I’ve always been fascinated with the idea of analogue video techniques, and don’t really understand why people go to great lengths to copy the aesthetic digitally, when they could just try to get a real one. 

Analog video aesthetic by Marta Verde
Analog video aesthetic by Marta Verde, for Tensal’s show at LEV Matadero

Do you use social media a lot to promote your work?

You can follow me if you like, my instagram account is mainly dominated by photos of my cat and screenshots of my work. I don’t really get work through social media channels, people tend to contact me directly. The work is really interesting and every project is completely different. Usually I’m presented with some kind of problem and I find ways to solve it.

Apart from doing visual performances, you are currently working at a Fab Lab, right?

It’s very common for freelancers to supplement their work through teaching, which I love. I find it really motivational and inspiring to work with young people and their ideas. I used to work as a coordinator in a Fab Lab, and I still give classes on programming and digital manufacturing there, but not on a regular basis anymore. I tend to work in different locations and on a more ad-hoc basis, that way I can combine teaching with my own projects.

If you want to read more about Marta’s work, you can check her artist profile page here.

The post Marta Verde on her live A/V show with Tensal, at LEV Matadero appeared first on Audiovisualcity.

3D light and audiovisual show by Huma and Eyesberg

Par Hayley Cantor



This week, we caught up with Huma about his most recent project ‘Eva,’ to find out a little more about how his musical project developed into a live AV show. Huma is Andrés Satué’s personal project, an evolution from his early musical days in a rock band to his more recent progression into the world of electronic music. He’ll be performing ‘Eva’ at Mira Festival, Fabra i Coats, Barcelona, Thursday 7th November

Tell us a bit about the visual side of your show. What can the audience expect in terms of live A/V performance?

The idea is to treat light from a 3D environment by making the light beams coincide, forming geometric figures in motion in the air.

Have your created the visual part of the show yourself or collaborated with a visual artist? (If so, who and why?) If not, tell us about how you developed the project and any challenges you faced in dealing with both elements of the performance.

I’m working with Jose Vaaliña from Eyesberg studio. It was a very natural collaboration, we met after finishing two gigs I did in Barcelona and we talked about the possibility of working together as we have very similar ideas about the relation between music and visuals, now it’s happening and I can say we are both really happy with the results.

What tools and set up are you using for the show? 

We are using 5 powerful projectors, various smoke machines (fog and hazer) and also some visuals. The beams of light will react to sound to create a symbiosis between both. Also we will use some lights and strobes for punctual moments.

How do you feel about the importance of the visual experience in your projects past and present?

It is something I have always thought about as a very important element. Even when I played in rock bands lots of years ago we always carried a few lights to add impact to the final part of the show.

Since I’m working as Huma, I collaborated with Drömnu using visuals at the very beginning, then moved to colorful L.E.D.s, smoke and strobes working with Juan Pablo Larrazabal and now I wanted to try new things and Jose appeared. I like the idea of doing something immersive, not something that you have to look at the detail or that can distract the public but something that will enhance the music. 

You’ve been making music for more than 10 years now. What is the project that you are most proud of, or have the most attachment to so far?

Well, I’m always more attached to the last thing I’ve ever done. Even though I really think that ‘Eva’ and this show is the project in which I have worked the most on and the project I’m the proudest of to date.

Got any questions for Andrés, Eyesberg, or just want to share anything with us? Jot down your thoughts below 🙂

https://hedonicreversal.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/hedonicreversal/

https://hedonicreversal.bigcartel.com/

The post 3D light and audiovisual show by Huma and Eyesberg appeared first on Audiovisualcity.

Prueba

Par Hayley Cantor

The post Prueba appeared first on Audiovisualcity.

creative.space’s //DEUS EX Gets Huge Performance Boost with Integration of NF1 Cards

Par Desert Moon Communications

Hybrid storage solution in creative.space platform adds speed and capacity with small form factor SSD Atlanta, GA – June 12, 2019 – DigitalGlue has announced that its //DEUS EX – the hybrid NVMe SSD and HDD media storage solution in its creative.space platform, is now available with NF1 (New Form Factor 1) for customers that ...

Fibre optics and psychedelic fractals at Mutek Barcelona

Par Hayley Cantor

Presentation of the 10th Edition

After taking 2 years to convince Mutek Montreal, Mutek Barcelona was eventually launched as the first unique satellite of the International Digital Arts festival based in Europe in 2009. 10 years later, they provide Spain with one of the main references in audiovisual performance and digital arts in the format of a 4-day festival, with a wide variety of shows and venues.

Nonotak studio ‘Zero Point Two’

Nonotak studio, formed of two young creatives, Noemi Schipfer (FR) and the architect musician Takami Nakamoto (JP). They work together to create experimental audiovisual light installations that mesmerize audiences. At Roca Gallery, Takami explained how they project blue light onto yellow fibre optics in order to create the purest possible visible white light in an audiovisual experience. Usually the installation is covered from above, but on this occasion, they were so surprised by the way it combined with the venue that they left it uncovered, allowing us to experience the installation in a whole new light, literally.

Microfeel ‘Fractal Synethesia’

Microfeel (ES/AR) well known on the local scene as multimedia artist Sebastian Seifert, dazzled us with his latest project ‘FRACTAL SYNESTHESIA.’ Sebastian leaves audiences looking for the visual artist only to discover that Microfeel is a one man band, where Sebastian simultaneously projects and performs in an extremely colourful, psychedelic live A/V show. This year he gave it more energy than ever, making it pretty tricky to photograph the artist still in any moment. His performance filled the room with energy.

Mutek Festival

Nonotak Studio
Microfeel

Article by Hayley Cantor

Photos by Hayley Cantor (AKA VJ AYL) and Groovycosta

The post Fibre optics and psychedelic fractals at Mutek Barcelona appeared first on Audiovisualcity.

Audiovisual City interviews L’Aubaine

Par Nina Verhagen

Audiovisual City met up with L’Aubaine and interviewed her.

This is how it went down.

The article about L’Aubaine is here.

The post Audiovisual City interviews L’Aubaine appeared first on Audiovisualcity.

Audiovisual City at WE LIVE IN AN OCEAN OF AIR

Par Nina Verhagen

‘We live in an Ocean of Air’ is a virtual reality experience where the invisible connection between plant and human is revealed through breath. It was created by Marshmallow Laser Feast.

What happens is that the cutting-edge technology illuminates the invisible connections between the human and nature world. What you’ll see when the installation starts, is the giant Sequoia tree. You’re being transported into a world that’ll leave your jaw on the ground and eyes wide open- wanting to capture every detail you’re seeing. And as time passes, the scenery changes as well.

Breathe in and out and you’ll see you’re right in the installation. The color changes and you can even move it around as you breathe out. It’s done with breath and heart sensors that are tracking your real-time breathing and essentially put it in the virtual reality. Making it even more immersive than it already was.
It’s a magical world you’re stepping into and time will feel as none-existant.

The installation will embolden you to reflect on the reality that we, as human beings, aren’t the only thing on this planet. We share our planet with other organisms and it’ll make you cerebrate about the responsibility that we carry. And reflect on our dependence.

It is a great experience and it stays in your mind even when it’s over. Overwhelming and impressive! We need more installations like this.

The post Audiovisual City at WE LIVE IN AN OCEAN OF AIR appeared first on Audiovisualcity.

Audiovisual City interviews VJ’s

Par Nina Verhagen

Audiovisual City went to a VJ London meeting and interviewed three different VJ’s: Mowgli, Marta, and Pete.

AVC: Can you tell us something about yourself?

Mowgli: My first job out of school was DJ, I literally left school and I started working in a club fulltime as a DJ. One day I went to see my friend’s band play -they’re kind of a post-rock band- and he asked me after the gig what I thought about it and I thought it was great but it was quite boring to look at them. There was no frontman, and there’s no singer. They all just looked at the floor. They needed some visuals. And he said to me, “You do them”. And that was my first VJ’ing gig. That’s how I got into VJ’ing.
I mean, I’ve done visuals before but I never even thought it was a thing. I was just doing visuals with light projections but there was no VJ’ing. It was just ‘I’m putting a light projector in a club’. From there on I started to get into the VJ thing and I started doing visuals more and more. I started doing like corporate stuff and then I started coming to VJ London.
Suddenly it expanded and I realized that there were more and more people what I was doing and that it had a name. From there, in 2008, they did a VJ competition at the London International Music Show. Which happens every year. I was selected as one of the eight finalists of Europe for that. I didn’t win but it was a big thing at the time.
I played at the Big Chill festival. I play loads of festivals. Moving on from the VJ’ing, I started doing audiovisual performances. Which is what I do mostly nowadays. But I also started doing more interactive stuff. I had an award-winning installation at Burning Man, in 2011.

Marta: I’m a visual artist/ designer with a passion for performing arts. My artistic development has been initially shaped at The High School of Fine Arts in Krakow and later I mastered my skills in studying graphic design at the Pedagogical University of Krakow. I’ve got over 8 years of experience of creating video projections, mappings and LED installations for various music, arts, and events related projects. I’ve worked as a VJ at cyclical gigs in Krakow and London. During that time I collaborated with many musicians and artists from all around the world and I was a resident VJ at Prince of Wales, London.

Pete: I don’t think I consider myself a VJ anymore because I rarely do VJ’ing anymore for other people. I still love the culture and I believe that it’s something very important in my life, however, the last gig I did was like a half year ago in Brighton. It was a commercial gig and I completely hated it. Because basically, it was… I kind of forgot how the commercial part of VJ’ing looked like, so I was being asked to just show the logos. And people kept coming over to me that it was the wrong logo but they didn’t even bother me to give it to me before.
So I would say that a lot of stuff in my life happened because of the VJ’ing, but I don’t consider myself a VJ anymore.

AVC: What drew you into the AV culture?

Mowgli: I’ve always liked doing creative things but I’ve never had an agenda. I was never like ‘I wanna pursue that’. I’ve always been very open. So most of the things I’ve done, I’ve done because something’s happened. Something’s taken me down that road. But it wasn’t really a conscious thing most of the time. So getting a DJ job straight out of school, that was a complete coincidence. Like I used to go to this club with a friend of mine in Madrid, and it was a very niche club at that point in time. And then one day a DJ who worked there came over to us and said, “You two have got most of the records that we play here, right?” And we were like, “Yea, yea”. She told me that she wanted to go on a holiday but needed to find a replacement. She asked us to take over and we did. And she was never taken back by the club.
We basically stole her job. She gave us her job and then it was never given back to. But I never went out looking for that. It just happened. It’s the same with like doing VJ’ing. A friend of mine said, “Oh, you do it”. And then I was like, “Oh yea, I’ll do it”. And from then on, I mean that was the start really. With my friend saying that I should do it and then me getting more and more interested in it. And looking more into it and learning more things. Developing in that direction. And very involved in that use of technology.

Marta: In 2010, when I was living and studying in Krakow, I went to Jonsi’s concert during the Sacrum Profanum Festival. I didn’t expect that event to set a new direction in my life, I didn’t even plan to go there, it was very last minute, my friend gave me a spare ticket. I liked the concert a lot and I was absolutely amazed by the visual part of the show. Projection, lights, music and space, everything together was combined perfectly and it was a beautiful experience. I was so moved and inspired that at that moment I decided this is what I want to do in my life. In a very short time, I quit my job and I booked my first gig where I was going to do live visuals. It went pretty good and since then I worked as a VJ. I had a few other jobs in the meantime, but I never gave up my passion. I was lucky to meet many great people and we’ve done some awesome shows together. Three years ago I moved to London. I found the company that designed Jonsi’s live show that I saw in Krakow 8 years ago. It’s 59 Productions and another amazing part of this story is that now I work there.

Pete: Well, the thing is the VJ’ing is one thing and the audiovisual culture is some other thing. They’re not the same thing. They’re interconnected however, there are slight differences. Because for me it’s kind of the natural way of progressing from a purely visual side. Whilst to try to do audiovisual performances with people. Because I realized this is a powerful way of making people feel something.
However, my visual adventure started in coding. I was a programmer and I did graphics before it even was a thing and a name. I made the demos in 1996… 1998, I was sixteen back then. So that was my whole root of digital creativity. That’s where everything stems from. Because it kind of converted into the audiovisual performance group. They were playing the ambient music and I was playing the graphics. So my roots were actually in programming.
At the moment I mostly work as a creative developer. And I try to focus my activity on VR because I believe that is the next step forward. Because this is something that is the next level. You can not only the audio but also the visuals and movements, that gives you a very powerful storytelling opportunity.

AVC: What about your current and future projects?

Mowgli: I tend not to think about the future. As I said, I just go along and do things and keep evolving and suddenly… I’m easily distracted. I have millions of projects that I never finish. Like, I start something feeling excited, but halfway through I get excited by something else and pause the first one. And then sometimes I do go back to the previous things but not really finish them but utilize whatever state they’re in and doing something completely different. I recycle my stuff.
The thing I’ve been working on most in the last couple of years is an audiovisual synthesizer. Which sounds great but in reality it’s a mini-controller that’s mapped to both able in Live and Resolume. But I don’t need to look at the computer screen. It’s basically like a really big mini-controller with loads of sliders and stuff. And using that, I do audiovisual performances which are always improvised. It’s got generative visuals. And generative audio in a way. It’s about the interface. You just fiddle with the knobs and create visuals and audio at the same time. And I’ve been doing that for a while. So I’m starting to think I need to do a newer version of that. I got lots of ideas on how to make it better and whatever, so that’s one thing.
On the other side, I’m also getting more interested in doing just sound performances with no visuals. Because I’ve been getting more and more into them… I don’t want to call it music and call myself a musician. I don’t have enough musical training. I like making sounds.
It’s all just an exploration. Sometimes the stuff you stumble on and make is really bad and other times it’ll be really good. You just gotta roll with it.

Marta: Before joining 59 Productions I was working as a freelancer, mostly for music-related events, a huge part of that was live electronic music. My visuals were characterized by multiple dissolving and interfusing layers. With time, my work got more minimalistic and monochromatic.
I’m interested in creating interactive installations and audiovisual artworks that allows an audience to be a part of the performance, to experience sound, lights, and projections surrounding them. In order to achieve that I play with dimensions and visual perception, make projection seem 3-dimensional. I design shapes to project onto them or I use object and surfaces already existing in the space. My shows were never 100% planned, there was always lots of space for improvisation.
Currently, I am a part of a design team at 59 Productions– a company of artists creating video design for stage and live events. I assist with artwork and animation content for the show. Since joining 5 months ago I’ve worked on a variety of theatre, exhibition and VR projects, including an exhibition for Imperial War Museum in London, VR artwork ‘Nothing to be Written’ and ‘Deep Field’- a film inspired by the Hubble Space Telescope discovery. Most recently I was working on ‘Black and White’- a theatrical show produced by JACC in Kuwait. It was a great opportunity for me to get to know more about a narrative type of visual arts.
I’m looking forward to taking up new design challenges.

Pete: At the moment I’ve done some commercial projects for different companies. However, I have been getting more involved in tech. Because the big part of the whole audiovisual immersive business is knowing how to deal with tech. How to make tech do what you want them to do.
I found it really interesting to do this for a commercial purpose and reuse to my personal projects. So this year, because of my own personal circumstances, I was mostly focusing on commercial projects which might not have been that interesting. But one of the things I did this year that I want to continue with next year is an audiovisual look machine. That’s a project I’ve been doing for the last two-three years and with different people. We’re playing some events as well.
Hopefully, I’m going to reach a state where I go from software working progress and turn it into a hardware working instrument. And the other project is basically I want to explore more of the new technology with VR. With a new headset that’s cheap enough for people to buy it.

The post Audiovisual City interviews VJ’s appeared first on Audiovisualcity.

AV Link Jam / BYOB Event in London

Par Nina Verhagen

AV Link Jam / BYOB was organized by Crux, the hub for learning, experimenting, collaborating and entertaining, on Thursday, November 15th, 2018. It was their second edition and free for everyone who wanted to join.

When you entered the space, it all seemed very open and chill. People were drinking beer, talking to each other, walking around and admiring the people’s work. Almost every wall had a beamer projection on it. It was very diverse which made it refreshing. You weren’t looking at the same thing at every wall. Every minute it’d change so even if you’d be watching the same projection, you wouldn’t look at a video that was on a loop.

Because it was a free event, the genuinely passionate artists show up. It looked like a community, people know each other and talk about the same topic. When you would talk to the artists about their projection, you could see the fierce enthusiasm they had for it.

The soundtrack worked really well with the atmosphere. Many different things were going on at the same time but the music helped to keep you focused.

All and all, it was quite mesmerizing and hypnotic. It kept your eyes stuck on the all the projects you were seeing. It all moved fast, had bright colors, and had recurring movements. It’s a very fun night where you can chat and check out new and different artists. A good concept!

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Audiovisual City interviews Post Bellum

Par Nina Verhagen

Audiovisual City interviews: Post Bellum, one of the artists at SIGNAL festival.

  • What is your artistic background and main inspirations in the new media art field?

I studied art and architecture at The Technical University in Liberec. Students of my generation were influenced by conceptual artist Stanislav Zippe. Maybe for this reason, I try to combine architecture and multimedia in my work. Therefore, we have established two platforms that work in synergy Kolmo.eu and Loom on the Moon.com

  • What is Audiovisual to you and how do you position yourself in that culture?

We have recently worked on an audiovisual representation of historical topics for various museums and installations. We find challenging to use contemporary visual language to speak about events and moments in our distant and recent history. It is not our only focus, yet it is a territory we have been exploring for a couple years now. We do not look in the past scenes as into the hermetic events which do not have any correlation with lives we have today. We rather pick out those which do have relevance to today in our view.

  • We were very impressed with the immersive use of video-mapping as a documentary tool. Can you tell us about the creative process behind Memory of the Nations?

Memory of the Nations is the organization focused on collecting of testimonies. It is a wide archive (7000 people recorded up to date) of subjective views on past events. The phenomenon of subjectivity was very attractive to us as it’s in contradiction with mainstream explanation of history. We, in collaboration with Pink productions (coauthors of the exhibition), have tried to avoid black and white viewpoint, therefore, we have focused on situations in which the human rights or human dignity were most violated. In those darkest places we could find bravery, humanity, and characters with strong moral principles.

We feel that everyone is tired by straightforward information oriented rhetoric, for that reason we have split the installation into two main parts. Almost like the two halves of the brain, one-half emotional and subconscious and the other narrative and rational.

It was challenging to cover such a long historical period of 100 years so we highlighted two totalitarian periods our nation underwent during this time. It is important for us to keep these past atrophies on the display so the public could be on guard when politics start to go wrong. Somehow the recent rise of populists and post fact demagogues in the world makes us believe that such an ambition is more relevant than ever.

  • Audiovisual culture is progressively becoming more prominent and known in the Czech Republic and Prague. What’s your opinion about the Czech AV scene nowadays also regarding public and private support to artists and events?

When I returned back to the Czech Republic from Netherlands where I had lived for 5 years, I noticed that Prague scene around film, animation, and multimedia is full of skilled people who were great to work with. For that reason, I have been trying to promote this field abroad. It is fun to work with these people on some projects in Singapore or Hong Kong or elsewhere and bring our sensitivity, skills, and improvisation to the table.

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SIGNAL 2018 reportage

Par Nina Verhagen

SIGNAL festival invited us to come to the festival in Prague which was on the 11th until the 14th of October, 2018. We are very grateful to have been invited and that they have taken such good care of us.
SIGNAL is a relatively young festival but made a huge impact on the audiovisual culture since the very beginning. It has a great offer of video mapping, interactive installations, and generative art. The last edition attracted around 600.000 people.

Every year, SIGNAL puts together an audiovisual journey across the beautiful backdrop that is the city of Prague. It gives the chance to locals and international visitors to really discover the city under a new light.

This is what we saw during our visit.

Event feature here.

Guillaume Marmin

Rococo is a totem made of 124 projectors shooting light beams. As soon as viewers step in, they are bombarded by powerful audiovisual inputs transforming the beautiful ‘Colloredo-Mansfeld Palace’ in an ever-changing space. The surrounding soundtrack makes you progressively forget where you are, bringing you in a captivating trance as you stare at the beams.

 

Post Bellum

An impressive use of video mapping projection to document amongst the darkest moments in the last one hundred years of European history. Avoiding the spectacularization, ‘Memory of the Nation‘ enthralled the viewers, thanks to clever use of real video and audio footage

 

3dsense

3dsense offered an impressive projection with two synchronized screens. It showed a creatively put and well-thought-out black hole’s gravitational field in the universe. That mixed with an intense soundtrack displayed a complex unity that immerses you into the piece.

 

Chevalvert

A wonderful piece of interaction design, where the users had the chance to create their own lighting performance by the simple motion of their hands. Highly involving and easy to approach. It created an instant connection with the audience and the art.

 

_STROY

_STROY is a multi-creative studio based in the Czech Republic. In their pioneering project, they combine graffiti with video mapping and sound art. Aesthetically astounding and captivating, they’re taking video mapping to a whole new level.

 

Hotaru Visual Guerrilla

Quite new to the scene, the AV collective Hotaru Visual Guerrilla managed to capture the viewers’ senses from the first instant. An amazing 3D video mapping, dragging us in a future world where microorganism, bioforms, breathes and expands from the façade of the surrounding space. A must-see in the audiovisual culture.

 

Hyperbinary

Hyperbinary proposed a very mature and cutting-edge video mapping made of pure lights. The building Kooperative has been animated from the inside instead of being projected on it using LED strips. A thoughtful investigation about how particles are set in motion and spread across the space creating energy. The result is a calm and monumental wave.

 

Ruestungsschmie.de

On the Church of St. Ludmila Ruestungsschmie.de delivered a video mapping masterpiece, empowered by a stunning sound design. Every single element of the façade comes alive under the audiovisual thunderstorm. Our senses are constantly tickled and moved restlessly following the projective narrative across the service.

 

XYZ

Watch 2,1/18’ is an ambitious and innovative art piece picturing a dystopian future under constant surveillance. The immersive installation used moving lights across the Vinohrady square to track the viewers. Microphones recorded their sounds to eventually combine them with an eerie soundtrack. No matter where you moved, you were always watched.

 

Simona Chládková & Matyáš Skalický

Simona and Matyáš are two students of ‘the Czech Technical University’. They created an LED interactive gateway connecting the train station to their university. Enjoyable and effective. We hope to see more from these young and upcoming artists.

 

Struny Signalu

Organik triggers an intense dialogue between new media, art, music, and architecture, in the beautiful Salvator church. The gothic constructive elements are gradually revealed and enhanced by the moving lights, while the compelling music from the organ surrounds the viewers. Our senses are fully absorbed in this powerful audiovisual symphony.

 

Romain Tardy

Future Ruins, a beautifully crafted video mapping dialoguing with the LED installations which decomposes the architectural elements of the Neo-Romanesque church of St. Cyril and Methodius.
Ruins of a dystopian future lie upon us and come back to life through the use of lights and video mapping.

 

SOFTlab

An interactive installation with mirrors following the viewers, bouncing their reflection across the space together with the beautiful decorations of the ‘Mirror Chapel’.

 

Tomáš Dymeš

A buoyant interactive piece immediately connects with the audience of all ages and backgrounds.

 

Marpi Studio

An interactive simulation that shows the sea life under a microscope. It’s a never-ending generative art project.

 

Richard Loskot and UAII studio

An interesting representation of the natural elements using new media. A piece with stormy clouds made of foam, lights, and sounds.

 

An overall high quality and several innovative art pieces, setting new trends and standards in audiovisual culture. Congratulations to the organizers and see you next year!

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Audiovisual City interviews SIGNAL CEO Martin Posta

Par Nina Verhagen

Audiovisual City went to SIGNAL festival and interviewed the founder and CEO of the festival: Martin Posta. 

This is how it all went down.

The article about our time at SIGNAL is here.

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Audiovisual City interviews SIGNAL artists

Par Nina Verhagen

Audiovisual City went to SIGNAL festival and interviewed four artists: _STROY, XYZ, Hyperbinary, and Simona Chládková.

This is how it all went down.

The article about our time at SIGNAL is here.

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The Search for (New Media Art) Pleasure at Mira Festival

Par Hayley Cantor

We look forward to visual treats at Barcelona’s ever-growing digital arts festival, Mira. Hosted at the old fabric factory in the Sant Andreu district of Barcelona, Fabra i Coats is the venue of dreams for many festival goers and organisers. Each year, we’ve seen the gradual addition of a full dome experience, more and more live visual performances and installations, with this year including an impressive new media art exhibition to get the old brain cogs turning. Let’s leave the work to speak for itself. We present you with our summary of our Mira experience of the Friday night at the festival in form of a photographic journey through new media art time and space…

Mira Dome by Adidas Originals

“Extraordinary Alien” by Fatima Al Aqdiri & Transforma

 

The Search for (Modern) Pleasure (Exhibition, various artists)

Keiken, Nati Cerutti, AGF Hydra, Suzanah Pettigrew and George Jasper Stone: Digital Pleasures

Visual orgasms – Faith Holland

Filip Custic – Cuadro Virtual

Esmay Wagemans – New Humanity

Carlos Sáez – Hardware Fetish

Field – Scan I-IV Collection courtesy of Sedition

Tangerine Dream (Live A/V)

Interactive lighting system using Cinema 4D – 3D sound room by Tigrelab

Call super (DJ set) with Natalia Stuyk (VJ Set)

All photos copyright Hayley Cantor

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Audiovisual Artists at Mira Festival

Par Nina Verhagen

Barcelona November 8-10 2018. Mira has been converting during the years as the most important Audiovisual festival in Barcelona. The festival proposes an interesting line-up of Electronic musician and Audiovisual artists!

AVCity feature: www.audiovisualcity.org/mirafestival
 
 

GAIKA

gaika-540x320

GAIKA’s art reflects on the contemporary conflicts of his native city and beyond, diffracting them through a “collection of alchemical parables for all the Immigrants who wander the earth in search of themselves”, inviting the listener/witness to become immersed in a shared historical narrative with blackness at its core.

 

AMNESIA SCANNER present AS ORACLE

amnesia-scanner

Amnesia Scanner’s world is a weird and eerie one: a reflection of our own through a black mirror covered influorescent slime in which what’s “real” and what isn’t become one and the same.

 

M.E.S.H. feat. MICHAEL GUIDETTI

mesh

North American producer and DJ James Whipple (aka M.E.S.H.) is a sonic alchemist of the highest order, distilling found sounds, hard percussion, violent cinematic effects, and virtual-acoustic instrumentation and transforming them all beyond recognition in the isolation of his Berlin studio.

 

EARTHEATER 

eartheater

Wordplay, symbolism, idiosyncratic spirituality, cheekiness, contradiction… Eartheater’s world is as fascinating as its creator. Also known as New York-based artist Alexandra Drewchin, this truly unique voice in contemporary music melds foley-filled digital production, a three-octave vocal range, and experimental pop composition, creating detailed sonic tapestries and romantic, gestural electronica in the process.

 

CLAIRE TOLAN

claire-tolan

Talk by Claire Tolan who will tell us about her career in the sound exploration of ASMR (Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response) and about her project The State of ShÜSh, an offshoot of ASMR and the central figure of an ASMR role-playing game that Tolan is developing and will also present in the gallery. In the conference, she will talk about the origins and theory of the game, with particular emphasis on its foundations in ASMR.

 

FILIP CUSTIC

filip-custic

Conversation with Filip Custic revolving around his methodology and vision of art, technological hedonism, the analysis of universal pleasure and his relations with learning and digital platforms. He creates his own “vocabulary of objects” by means of a new movement he is developing and which he has dubbed “objectism”. To express himself, he uses a camera to capture photos and videos and also manipulates their audio content.

 

KEIKEN

keiken

Performative and immersive conference that seeks to unfold the implications of contemporary society in the digital era. The Keiken collective will develop an immersive atmosphere by means of sound, performative actions, and projections of digital works and 3D video. The conference is based on a series of chapters that display several contemporary themes, to offer the audience a more tangible and performative experience.

 

OBJEKT

objekt

Objekt is the contemporary DJ’s DJ. Unpredictable, hypnotic and compelling, his sets span styles, decades and BPMs as he navigates freely between techno of all forms, off-kilter experimental beats, breakneck electro, acid, noise, house, EBM and anything else necessary to illustrate his vision of electronic music.

 

MR TC

mr-tc

MR TC is the alias of Glasgow-based musician and DJ Thomas Lea Clarke. As a resident of Glasgow’s Art School and founder of the Night of the Jaguar club night, he provides the Scottish city’s scene with an alternative vision of the dancefloor: one that embraces the weird, dark, slow, off-kilter and psychedelic productions he has become known for through his releases on Optimo Music.

 

TUTU

tutu

Tutu’s sessions are odes to life; windows that to look out towards sonic horizons both distant and near. Also known as Gemma Planell, the Barcelona-based artist has risen through word-of-mouth to become a much sought after DJ, recognized for her 3-deck sets that see her traverse the spectrum of contemporary electronica and abstract rave styles, blending soundscapes, jagged rhythms and schizophrenic techno with masterful prowess.

 

OMEGA III

omega-iii

Omega III is the artistic identity of Barcelona-based DJ and graffiti artist Tommy Noble. Born and raised in Sheffield, he began to take an interest in electronic music in the early 90s with the emergence of Warp Records and the northern Bleep movement.

 

DJOHNSTON

djohnston

As is common in DJs who began mixing indie and electronica (his artistic name is a tribute to singer-songwriter Daniel Johnston), DJohnston is characterised by a great versatility on the decks, which he’s deployed through mixing all kinds of styles in many events and venues in Barcelona and even in European temples such as Sub Club, Rex Club or Fuse.

 

TANGERINE DREAM

tangerine-dream

Undoubtedly one of the most pioneering electronic groups of the past 50 years, Tangerine Dream have released over one hundred records since their formation in West Berlin in 1967, creating thousands of hypnotic synth patterns and soundscapes in the process. Following the death in 2015 of the band’s legendary founder, Edgar Froese, the remaining members (Thorsten Quaeschning, Hoshiko Yamane and Ulrich Schnauss) vowed to continue working together to realize Froese’s musical visions.

 

VENETIAN SNARES x DANIEL LANOIS

Photo by Sebastién LeBlanc

How could one imagine, or even begin to describe, the results that stem from a collaboration of this nature? Both legends in their own right, these two great musical minds have come together out of mutual admiration and, as Daniel Lanois states, “an appetite for the unknown”, to create a new and bold statement that elevates their collective strengths and bridges the different terrains of their vast musical landscapes.

 

YVES TUMOR feat. EZRA MILLER

yves-tumor

Fear, chaos, fragility, strength, pleasure, pain, love… above all, love; Yves Tumor’s art expresses all this and so much more. If there is such a thing as an iconoclastic artist in today’s musical scenario, Yves Tumor is one of them. At the crossroads between performance art, BDSM practices, ritual experiences, and full-on punk/rave destruction, his live show is one of the most mind-bending around.

 

AVALON EMERSON

avalon-emerson

Avalon Emerson ‘s sound is that of the desert. Born surrounded by the mysterious Sonoran landscapes of Arizona, their dreamlike expanse and abstract textures have no doubt found their way into her sonic approach and aesthetic. Currently based in Berlin, she cut her teeth as a DJ in San Francisco’s warehouse party scene, the energy of both cities clearly transmitted through her work.

 

CALL SUPER

call-super

Call Super is the main moniker under which Berlin-based, British producer, DJ, and musician Joseph Richmond Seaton creates an incredibly colourful, unique and evocative soundworld that has quietly but steadily led him to carve out his own place in the landscape of contemporary electronic music.

 

DJ STINGRAY

dj-stingray

Many only know Sherard Ingram by his eyes, gazing out from his black balaclava. Perhaps best known for his association with Drexciya, for whom he was tour selector, DJ Stingray is as Detroit as techno itself. The now cult DJ was part of the city’s second wave, but somehow remained an outsider, and it wasn’t until the ’10s that the international scene began to recognise his distinctive talents.

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