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MID

Par Nina Verhagen

MID is an interaction design and technology studio, specializing in engineering, interactive design, and new media. They work with museums, marketing and communication agencies, architects, public institutions, companies, entrepreneurs, musicians, and artists.

Their studio was founded in Barcelona in 2009. MID’s origins are found in the arts production centre Hangar, a meeting point for creative professionals, artists, programmers, and designers. This background, along with the experience acquired by the management team, allowed MID to become an established studio.

Contact

LINK BOX

Mid.studio

 

Facebook_logo(2)

 

 

The post MID appeared first on Audiovisualcity.

Toru Izumida

Par Marco Savo

Toru Izumida is an audio & visual artist who graduated from the Musashino Art University in Tokyo, Japan in 2010, and currently lives and works in New York.

In his A/V live sets he uses multiple layered programmed visuals reacting to the live soundscape.

In 2019, he showcased his live A/V sets at //Dreamlands\\ presented by Testu Collective x Ideal Glass Studios. He is one of the organisers of 0 // 2019 Public Visuals, live A/V event in Brooklyn, NY.

TORU IZUMIDA

Contact

LINK BOX

Website

The post Toru Izumida appeared first on Audiovisualcity.

The Colour Project

Par Marco Savo

WE ARE CREATIVE CONTENT DESIGNERS AND VISUAL STORYTELLERS

Formed in 2012, The Colour Project is a UK based Motion Graphics and 3d Design studio specialising in video projection mapping.


We design shows and  visual content for, events, launches and epic architectural mapping shows. We produce original graphics, animations and bespoke video content to tell compelling stories and amaze audiences.

 
We’ve created shows internationally and at home, from galleries to World Heritage sites. Our audiences range from hundreds to tens of thousands and we work with brands and cultural organisations to create spectacular live events and installations in public spaces.

THE COLOUR PROJECT

info@colour-project.com

LINK BOX

Website

Instagram / Twitter / Facebook / Vimeo

The post The Colour Project appeared first on Audiovisualcity.

How Yotto Approaches DJ Gigs, Sets, and Mixing

Par Harold Heath
Yotto DJing

Finnish DJ and recording artist Yotto specialises in the clean, precise house music that exists in the space between deep and progressive. One of Anjuna’s breakout acts, his productions get plays from DJs including Sasha, Laurent Garnier, Annie Mac, and Jamie Jones and he has lent his remixing skills to artists like Gorillaz, Coldplay and […]

The post How Yotto Approaches DJ Gigs, Sets, and Mixing appeared first on DJ TechTools.

Marta Verde

Par Hayley Cantor

Marta is a Creative Coder and Digital Artists from Galicia, based in Madrid.

Originally, she studied Fine Arts, and now she is specialised in new media arts and digital technologies applied to the performance arts. She also teaches at the Fab Academy, as an expert in digital fabrication.

Marta develops visuals, interactive and generative graphics, as well as dynamic/interactive content for lighting design, custom electronic devices and wearables, interactive installations for musicians, dance and theatre companies, artists, designers and arts institutions.

Her work is constructed through the use of custom built software and hardware specific to each visual set, allowing her to manipulate all the content in real time and to explore the limits of visual noise, repetition and the link between the organic and the electronic.

She works primarily in Spain and Portugal on a wide variety of projects, from theatre to festivals. Marta has also performed at festivals such as Primavera Sound, LEV Matadero, Sonic Arts Festival, MIRA and WOS Festival.

She also has taught about technology and interactivity at: IED Madrid, Ephemereal Architecture Masters Degree at ETSAM Madrid, Medialab-PradoLa Casa Encendida ,Fundación TelefónicaBAUUOC, and has mentored Hackatons at Makers of Barcelona with Ciclo.io.

https://martaverde.net/
www.instagram.com/martaverdebaqueiro
https://twitter.com/greenmartinha
https://www.facebook.com/martaverdebaqueiro

The post Marta Verde appeared first on Audiovisualcity.

⁣ ⁣⁣ ⁣#repost @desilence_⁣ ⁣__________________⁣ ⁣⁣ ⁣We have been...




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⁣#repost @desilence_⁣
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⁣We have been creating visual scenography for theatre, musicals and dance performances with love and passion for the last 15 years -⁣
⁣In our latest showreel you can see excerpts from most recent shows. Give it a look.⁣
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⁣🎶 @desertgrup .⁣
⁣#visualscenography #theatre #dance #musicaltheatre #visualarts #visualartists #scenography #millumin #unrealengine4 #stage #stagedesign #showreel2018
https://www.instagram.com/p/B4kFgV-Jff2/?igshid=1pnc58ic9s3lt

Shoeg (AKA Carlos Martorell)

Par Hayley Cantor


Carlos Martorell is a sound and visual artist based in a small Catalan town called Torelló, near Girona. His work focuses on the symbiotic relationship between humans and technology. He uses his programming skills and knowledge of new technologies to explore the visual and audio through the creation of experimental music and live AV.

Carlos Martorell by Xavi Casanueva

He creates sumptious virtual worlds through programming language such as Unity, as well as with 3D scans. It’s not uncommon to see him performing with non-traditional MIDI equipment, using apparatus such as gloves and hand-held technology, which as an adds a peculiar physical dimension to his live shows.

SHOEG: Website
LINK BOX: Soundcloud / Bandcamp / Instagram / Youtube / Resonate


Header photo © Hayley Cantor

The post Shoeg (AKA Carlos Martorell) appeared first on Audiovisualcity.

⁣ ⁣⁣ ⁣#repost @ex_lumina⁣ ⁣__________________⁣ ⁣⁣ ⁣Second...




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⁣#repost @ex_lumina⁣
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⁣Second #ledlight #artinstallation for @festilumi #bonifacio, featuring #3deffect on both #light and #audio in St Dominique street, making the festival entrance a real #immersiveart #audiovisual #experience. Made with love on @touchdesigner, @millumin2 and @mad_mapper, driving #sound and #lightcreation using only #video files.⁣⁣
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⁣⁣#lightsculpture #ledartist #immersiveexperience #lightart #lightartist #lightfestival #street #animation #festilumi #visualart #installationart #millumin #madmapper #madlight #leddisplay (at Bonifacio)
https://www.instagram.com/p/B5Hw6zHpAGg/?igshid=dnhjri1dco8n

⁣ ⁣⁣ ⁣#repost...




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⁣#repost @geraldinekwikmusic⁣
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⁣Ready for a new mapping light show with my new original music written for the Church in Lievin playing this night to Sunday night !!!⁣
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⁣Visual Artists : Susie-lou CHETCUTI, Patrick GRANDI, Jules HUVIG @juleshuvig/, Lucille JEANNIN, Loan LE HOANG, Simon LEBON, Hamza MRABET, Aurélien WOJTKO @_aurelien.w/ ⁣
⁣Music & Sound Design : Geraldine Kwik⁣
⁣Technique & Lights : Aurélien WOJTKO⁣
⁣Place : Église Saint-Amé - LIEVIN - FRANCE .⁣
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⁣#church #lightshow #lightart #light #lightinstallation #videomapping #loomprod  #originalsountrack #musicforpaintings  #mapping #composer #frenchcomposer #musicscore #ambient #composingmusic #sound #sounddesign #art #visual #millumin #madmapper #motiondesign #aftereffects #design #architecturalmapping #projectionmapping #movingimage #digitalartist #night
https://www.instagram.com/p/B7ba5jWppcU/?igshid=84b7s5bq9hzr

Aurore Valat-Marty, artiste 3D

Par Shadows

Découvrez les travaux de l’artiste Aurore Valat-Marty, qui a notamment eu l’occasion de travailler sur le cloth du film Croc-Blanc et en tant qu’artiste 3D chez Iconem, entité spécialiste du patrimoine que nous avions eu l’occasion d’interviewer. Elle cherche désormais à poursuivre sa carrière en tant qu’environment artist dans le jeu vidéo.

L’article Aurore Valat-Marty, artiste 3D est apparu en premier sur 3DVF.

How I Play: Satori

Par Ean Golden

When a producer makes the move from DJ to live performer, interesting things happen. In today’s new How I Play video, we’re sharing a behind-the-booth, onstage interview with Satori. In the video, Satori shares a ton of insight into how he’s able to manipulate his performance in real time, reacting to the crowd and the […]

The post How I Play: Satori appeared first on DJ TechTools.

QBert on the Photon Fader, his studio gear, and his favorite decade of drums to sample

Par Alex Amaro
qbert-photon-fader-header

What makes a legendary artist in the DJ community? Often it’s having a lasting impact – and QBert continues to do that. In today’s interview from DJTT guest contributor Alex Amaro, Q talks about his most recent projects, his studio gear, and more. Read on. Who is QBert? QBert is part of a select few […]

The post QBert on the Photon Fader, his studio gear, and his favorite decade of drums to sample appeared first on DJ TechTools.

Overlap

Par Hayley Cantor

Born in the heart of the VJ boom in the 90s, after their own artistic experimentation, and Michael’s first ever (what we would call now) VJ gig in 1985, Michael Denton and Anna McCrickard formed Overlap in 1998. They are based in Hastings in the UK. Unlike some VJs, who purely focus on the visual side of the art form, Overlap are a an AV collaborative duo in the purest sense of the concept, who also produce minimalist music in parallel with their exploration of both moving and still image. They’ve also performed at many a festival, forming part of a collective of VJs represented by Microchunk.

Their work takes the form of live audiovisual performances, exhibitions, transitional paintings, installations, VJ sets and even prints, and takes on audiovisual culture from a fine art perspective, which makes their work both fascinating and unique in a wide variety of different contexts.

Overlap started VJ-ing and performing AV sets as regular guests of resident VJs Reality Check at Turnmill’s club (The Gallery, London Calling) in 1998, guesting with Reality Check at The Chemical Brothers’ headline set at Turnmill’s Millenium gig in London’s Docklands. The next decade saw Overlap’s visuals splashed across screens at major international festivals including Creamfields, Andalucia, Electric Picnic Ireland, Glastonbury’s Glade stage, Pete Tong’s Wonderland in Ibiza and Glastonbury’s Glade, as part of the Microchunk visuals boutique. They created visuals for for the Industrial Resolution installation at the first Manchester International Festival: performed live on the largest indoor screen in Europe, accompanying the world’s leading DJs including Carl Cox, Fatboy Slim, Laurent Garnier, Layo, Pete Tong and Sasha. Overlap also played regular VJ slots at Razzmatazz (Loft), Barcelona and Pete Tong’s Wonderland, Eden, Ibiza (Deadmau5, Groove Armada). Overlap were commissioned by Microchunk to animate Damien Hirst artwork for Pete Tong’s Ushuaia at Le Grand Bazaar, Ibiza in 2013. 

Overlap also work with the Noise of Art collective as resident VJ-s and moving image artists. Their fine art single screen video works have been screened at the ICA, BFI and Tate Modern. Recent projects include:- a celebration of 100 Years of Electronic Music at the National Portrait Gallery London; Forest Tree limited edition for Sedition Art; audiovisual “painting” installations for the National Trust’s Fenton House and Calke Abbey; opening the Arquiteturas Film Festival in Lisbon with their Places that Dance AV set; short films “Returning” and “Switch” awarded special mentions at the Avanca and EMAF film festivals; an audiovisual performance in the British Ambassador’s Residence in Beijing. Recent art screenings/performances of their works have included Aquatint at Riders on the Mall/ROM, MUSZI, Budapest and Digital Graffiti, Florida, Forest Tree at STRP Biennale at Strijp S in Eindhoven and Cloud Edged at Light Fantastic, House of Nobleman, Frieze.

Perhaps one of the most poignant aspects of their audiovisual artwork is its accessibility and ability to be embraced and engaging in such an extensive mixture of spaces, including performances and installations everywhere from music festivals (Creamfields, Splice festival, Madatac, Fiber, Generate, Big Chill, STRP Biennale); and night clubs (Razzamatazz, Barcelona, Wonderland – Eden, Ibiza), to prestigious galleries (Tate Modern, Pompidou, National Portrait Gallery, the Victoria and Albert Museum), as well as being featured in some important publications on VJ culture, such as Audio – Visual Art and VJ Culture (2006) They even remixed and VJed The Beatles Magical Mystery Tour film for its cinema première at the South Bank with Noise of Art at London’s BFI.

Their working process involves adding and removing layers, degrees of opportunism and systematised chance, creating generative combinations ranging from slow transitional paintings, to fast flowing AV performances. 

Their most recent work includes Transitional Landscape, designed for exhibition and art installation, ‘Rooms’, which explores the relationship between indoors and outdoors, combining and fusing luscious wallpaper motifs with beautiful organic landscape scenes. It juxtaposes man-made life with that of the wonders of the natural world.  

Find out more about their work here:

Website | Seditionart | Bandcamp | Vimeo

The post Overlap appeared first on Audiovisualcity.

Embracing Lockdown: How DJs + producers are protecting their mental well-being

Par Matty Adams
Embracing Lockdown

Everyone in the dance music community has felt the impact of social isolation and a global shutdown. In today’s article, guest contributor Matty Adams has talked to nine DJs around the world about how they’re prioritizing their mental health and adjusting to our new reality. The current world isn’t easy for dance music Staring down […]

The post Embracing Lockdown: How DJs + producers are protecting their mental well-being appeared first on DJ TechTools.

Rencontre avec Gaëlle Seguillon, concept artist de Jurassic World à Aladdin

Par Shadows

Nous avions déjà eu l’occasion de vous présenter les travaux de Gaëlle Seguillon, concept artist qui a eu l’occasion de travailler sur plusieurs grosses productions ces dernières années (Ready Player One, Jurassic World, Aladdin…). Elle vient d’être interviewée par DigitalPainting.School en vidéo :

L’occasion de vous inviter à (re)découvrir ses travaux :

L’article Rencontre avec Gaëlle Seguillon, concept artist de Jurassic World à Aladdin est apparu en premier sur 3DVF.

Cinema AV (AKA Evan Henry)

Par Hayley Cantor

Evan Henry, from Dallas, Texas, is a truly multidisciplinary AV artist, who primarily works visually under the artistic name Cinema AV, but who is also known to write ambient music scores with both analog and digital synthesizers. His work embraces both analog and digital set ups, with his main interest visually representing sound.

What began as a love of photography, cinema and found footage grew into something much greater when in 2015, Evan was introduced to video circuit-bending and once-obsolete video electronics. Using these pieces in a live performance setting was always his goal, and from the get-go, tachyons boxes, vcrs, and video mixers turned into buying used Gieskes 3trinsrgb+1c standalone video synthesizer, building its expanders and just over a year later, the LZX cadet and castle line of DIY eurorack modules.

From there, video art went from beyond a hobby, to a complete way of life. Reliant on live performance, he plays at gigs relentlessly for both local, and touring artists alike. In 2018, he joined Ghostly Intl.’s Steve Hauschildt on a tour through the East Coast and Canada. He became the resident visual artist for Proton Limited in Dallas, Texas in 2019. These motions set the stage for a constantly evolving motion in the live visual dimension. 

Cinema AV’s work extends itself to instant and 35mm film renderings and has appeared in galleries and pop-up’s throughout North Texas. But when not playing live, or coordinating visuals for Dallas Ambient Music Nights, Evan is occasionally writing or building a set of modules for fellow artists.

The result is an infinitely growing body of work, that in the last few years has expanded itself into largely digital dimensions in Resolume Arena and Max/Msp. 

Website | Instagram | Facebook | Youtube | Bandcamp | Soundcloud | Vimeo

The post Cinema AV (AKA Evan Henry) appeared first on Audiovisualcity.

We pick the brains of Cinema.AV on his beautiful video synth work

Par Hayley Cantor




These days AV artists are hiding out all over the place, this time curiosity didn’t kill the cat, as I stumbled upon the work of Cinema.AV on Instagram. it’s amazing where a hashtag can take you… #videosynth. I was keen to find out how someone so visually analog ends up that way, and how they manage in an ever expanding digital world (at the time of writing more so than ever).

1.Tell us about your first ever live gig? When was it and how did it go?

For years, I used to play a kind of ambient, soundscape style of music, and for live performance, I would put whatever found vhs tape behind me for visuals. Often without a screen. It often just turned into lighting for my performance, instead of clearcut visuals. 

Fast-forward to a couple years later, in summer 2015, where I started buying jvc video mixers, archer and vidicraft boxes. It was here where I took it upon myself to do visuals for a show I had booked. Sadly, I didn’t realize, the projector couldn’t handle the distorted signals I was throwing at it. Luckily though, someone at the last moment, let me borrow theirs. It was total godsend. The result was this hyper-distorted cross between national geographic videotapes. It worked for the more abstract, psychedelia I had booked for the evening,

Later down the line, I found the need for time base correctors in live performance, and mixers equipped with such. To evenly blend, rather an abruptly with one of those RCA Y splitter cables turned on end. Which is actually the same as the classic Klomp dirty mixer. It was all stuff I got for free, or nearly no money. Never top of the line. Always the most difficult, least practical solutions. But the result was always unique to the moment, to the performance; endlessly fleeting. 

2.We discovered your work on Instagram. How do you usually connect with the AV community online? Does social media play a big role for you?

Strangely, yeah. I hardly ever go out locally, unless of course I’m playing a show. So beyond that setting, you’ll never find me in the wild. Even before this quarantine action, I was a total homebody. Staying in whenever possible to work on art and infinitely explore the machines. So having access to social media platforms is actually key to the whole system. I can actively gauge what pieces people actually like, what ideas stick and in turn, get shared with a larger audience. 

Its those posts that snowball into bigger and better gigs. As the recognition on a global scale is significantly more gratifying than just the local efforts I receive so often. In fact, for the better part of 2019, I was very busy with live video work. Having nearly no time off, I accepted this as a lifestyle, rather than just hobby. And in the social media zone, I’ve been able to publicly beta-test things like the Erogenous Tones Structure module, Phil Baljeu’s custom vector graphics system and as of late Andrei Jay’s latest raspberry pi video synth and feedback algorithms as hardware devices. The curiosity the results generated have in turn, sold modules and made the manufactures money to sustain their efforts.   

…having access to social media platforms is actually key to the whole system. I can actively gauge what pieces people actually like, what ideas stick and in turn, get shared with a larger audience. 

To be fair though, I’m not sure how much of this actually real. If it’s all made up, or the reactions are fabricated. It’s a fine silver-lining we’re all walking along. One day, a post could generate hundreds of interactions, while the next day, nothing. I think alot of that could actually be the option for folks to drift between realities, between the physical and the cyberspace. It’s in this cyberspace, that I do often connect with other artists, say for example my bud Konopka and has online video painting series. To watch him create something entirely from scratch, in real time, thousands of miles away is a true head-spin if you think about it. But not even 5 years ago would have been possible. 

All photos courtesy of Evan Henry.

3. It’s fascinating to how analog and digital worlds inspire AV artists. What’s your take on the two and how do you find working with analog systems for live visuals?

Truly. When I first got started, it was all analog, all found devices. Though in time, I’ve found the whole LZX modular zone, which started analog and now has drifted into this wild digital hardware dimension that has opened up all kinds doors. The obvious attraction to the large analog modular is the physicality and pure intuitive nature of the whole thing. As in a live setting, there is nothing more fun and unpredictable than a hand-wired mess of cables and devices to create this ever-fleeting dialogue, never again to be replicated. For ambient, for house, for techno and literally everything in between, there’s this infinite body that just works, and often never crashes or fails. 

If anything, it’s always the digital component that freezes or fails first. I’ve done shows with computer artists that for some reason or another, who just can’t make it work that particular night.

If anything, it’s always the digital component that freezes or fails first. I’ve done shows with computer artists that for some reason or another, who just can’t make it work that particular night. So just step in and end up taking over the evening with my system. However, I’ve had my fair share of venues tell me their systems are HDMI only. So learned to convert the analog composite outputs of the modular to the HDMI with aid of things like Ambery converters and scalers, Extron scalers, and even the silly Blackmagic shuttle, that has it’s own share of issues. It wasn’t until last summer that I realized the Roland V4-EX had a very effective means of conversion and scaling to HDMI, VGA, and back down again. The result was a total game-changer. So I sold my other mixers, and devices to scale up to HDMI and hadn’t looked back. This meant I could seamlessly work with digital projection systems and streaming processes. And from the get-go, it’s been used in every performance effort since. It’s even let me collaborate with both digital and analog artists alike. To fade and key between all manner of artists and ideas. 

So little things like that make the whole system go, which leads me into the question…

4.What’s your basic setup when do performance live AV shows? (If you have one)

I am constantly pushing myself as an artist. So every year or so, I’ll experience this major creative shift around winter time, when my job at the photo lab temporarily shutters for winter break on campus. It is is then where I have about a month to chill and regroup my mind. This generally means some new gear enters the studio, and in turn the dirty warehouses they get thrown into for live work. 

All photos courtesy of Evan Henry.

In 2019, I saw my modular system grow from a single 6U, two row case that could fly on any airline, to a larger 12U, four row system, that for the majority, made it’s way into every gig. In tandem with the V4-EX, the two were all I needed to do 8-10 hours of a rave whatever else I was getting booked for. However, the few time I flew out for one-offs, I brought it back down to 6U. Which was a lot of fun and lent itself to collaboration with other artists. It was in this time though, away from gigs and rather chill moments at the lab, where I began to experiment with the virtual dimension of VSynth, the Max/Msp visual extension. The result was very reminiscent of my larger modular system. Though at the time, my computer could only handle small patches. Anything big would see my computer begin to overheat and grind to a halt. 

This got me looking at computers, seriously.  As a video generation and manipulation tool, much in the same way the dedicated hardware was, but a larger, more sophisticated, and recallable level. It was months of research and a very generous donation within the family that lead me onto a gaming-oriented laptop, complete with a dedicated graphics card, that in it’s day was considered high-spec, and miles beyond my aging macbook. From the moment I lifted open the box and got it booted, I went straight into complex Max patches and dense 3D structures with the aid of Resolume Arena. When I realized I could save, and recall every motion, I started plotting how to gig with it. To layer to pieces together and to treat Resolume as a video sampler of my analog devices. What began to happen was a meshing of dimensions. No longer was one any better than the other. They were one of the same. It was with this entry that live performance physically became less stressful and far more manageable. No longer did have to carry this unwieldy modular system on a train or a bus. I could now discreetly carry the common laptop computer, just as everyone else. 

All photos courtesy of Evan Henry

Setting up and breaking down, with the projector, is a two cable, two power supply motion. So quick and so light. With the aid of a midi controller, all the tactility remains, and nothing changes. The digital results do look incredible though. I cannot deny that. No matter what I have though, I make the best of all of it. For touring, in 2020, my setup is just that. I did some dates with Steve Hauschildt and Telefon Tel Aviv across Texas and the process was so smooth. Same for the brief efforts with LLORA and BATHHOUSE, just weeks ago. So much less to think about, all with the same manipulations and motions.  

5. What would be your dream AV gig?

Currently speaking, the dream is still to tour, to travel and do large scale art installations with my video work. I had things lined up, but those have all fallen in favor of the current pandemic. But that’s honestly not going to hold anyone for long. These things will all still happen, just not soon as I had anticipated. I was truthfully hoping to break into the festival dimension; Mutek, Movement, Sonar, Aurora, as from a live scale, that feels like the next big move, amidst touring through the theaters and dedicated art spaces. I’ve had tastes of all those, but like anyone serious about their craft, I want to further and really make a name for myself, as truly, I don’t know what else to do. 

Find out more about Cinema.AV on his artist page

The post We pick the brains of Cinema.AV on his beautiful video synth work appeared first on Audiovisualcity.

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