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Arris Composites et l’utilisation de la fabrication additive composite pour la production de masse

Arris Composites, l’un des pionniers des matériaux composites de nouvelle génération, a annoncé fin mai qu’il avait obtenu un financement de 48,5 millions de dollars dans le cadre de la série B pour étendre ses capacités de fabrication de composites…

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Pourquoi Henkel a-t-il investi dans la fabrication additive ?

Fondée en 1876, Henkel est une multinationale réputée dans le secteur de la consommation et dans le secteur industriel. Bien que le siège social de l’entreprise soit situé à Düsseldorf, en Allemagne, plus de 80% de ses employés travaillent à…

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Interview to Paco Gramaje

This is our interview to Paco Gramaje, art director of the Paco Gramaje Studio in Barcelona.

The studio creates immersive multidisciplinary AV shows, especially focusing on the fusion between projection mapping and dance performance.

We asked Paco a few questions about his background and creative career and also about the new projects he has been cooking up during the quarantine period.

1. When did you start working on the interaction between audiovisual and dance performance, and how did you get involved? What are the aspects that are more appealing to you about working in this interdisciplinary field?

It all begun in 2009. After quitting my job as an engineer I moved to Madrid to study a Master in Motion Graphics while making my first experiences in the world of video art. 

In 2010 I started up several collaborations with art organizations in Madrid and they proposed to me to shoot a dance performance by the choreographer Iratche Ansa.

The performance was going to be held at the Matadero in Madrid. From that recording I put together my first video dance “Comunicación Interpretación Automática” which had a very good reception.

I had discovered the potential of dance from an audiovisual perspective and the inner revelation of what I wanted to do in the next few years.

A few months later I made my first dance pieces with live visuals with choreographer Barbara Fritsche.

Thanks to those projects I was able to work on the musical “Hoy No Me Puedo Levantar” in 2013. In 2014 I directed my first proper theatre show: “Girasomnis”.

Interview to Paco Gramaje
2. You are the creator of “Girasomnis”, an itinerant project that has been traveling around the world. Can you tell us about the creative process behind the inception of this innovative project?

I try to “connect” the visuals with the dancers. Sometimes I encourage the dancers to “connect” or follow my visuals.

In this project I also composed the music. This is very useful as I have better control of the creative process. With this project I tried to evoke feelings in the audience without words: just images, dance and instrumental music.

Paco Gramaje - Audiovisual artist
3. Paco Gramaje Studio recently launched the “Dance Mapping Virtual Tour 2020” which it’s fundraising on Gumroad. This is in preparation for a new cutting-edge AV dance project in 2021 involving a 360 immersive environment . Can you give us some insights about the whole project?

This quarantine caused an abrupt stop in my job, but also gave me time to start imagining something new.

The idea was born during the first week of confinement. At the start, It was simple: I just wanted to publish some of our best projects and make them public. But I also felt a need for a change.

The last 3 years I was quite disconnected from my artistic side due to working mostly on commercial projects. 

I was just focusing on making money to pay my bills and trying to have a stable team for audiovisual production. The outbreak of the Covid-19  has been an absolute shift in our work. We started questioning the possibility of doing our shows as we did before.

Therefore I needed to devise another type of format for the new normal awaiting us: a fully immersive virtual Dance Mapping Show.

As my previous theatre production, without the pressure of a client and using the Girasomnis music.

So, in April I started to visualize and write a synopsis of this new project. I then decided to publish “Dance Mapping Virtual Tour 2020” as a memorandum of all these years of physical shows. 

Now it’s time to go further. I want to gather all the knowledge I gained during the last 10 years and apply it to a virtual reality show, where I can break the limits and make an immersive 360º visual performance with dancers.

This new production is planned to be released in VR and physical 360 projection format in late 2021.

4. When working on a project how do you pick your collaborators? What are the main roles you look for in your team? 

When I have the budget I can work with some powerful audiovisual freelancers from my network of collaborators. Failing that I work alone.

I also work with very talented dancers/choreographers from Barcelona. During the years they started to understand my ideas and transform them in beautiful choreographies. 

5. Can you describe your general creative approach when starting on a new project?

I have mostly 2 ways of work. I compose a music draft and then I work on the visuals and choreography or vice versa: I make a draft of visual content with a draft choreography and I try to match the sounds and music.

Sometimes I give leeway to the dancer, so they can create their own choreography and then I create the visual content following their movements.

In the last few years I also worked with some talented musicians for a faster audiovisual production.

6. In 2015, Paco Gramaje Studio won an award at the International Mapping Festival in Girona for the Micro-mapping category. Could you share with us your thoughts about the concept of “Micro-mapping”? 

This was a concept from Roman Torre. In 2015 I shared a space with him and we collaborated together on a video mapping of a rotating stone. It was a nice project called Liquid Series.

In the video mapping area I also tried to develop innovative concepts, differing from the typical big projection on a building facade. 2 Years ago I started to develop the concept of “Holomapping”. I am planning to finish it next year as well.

7. We are aware you regularly teach courses and masterclasses of video mapping applied to performing arts, in Spain and Latin America.


What specific training would you recommend for digital artists who have just started their career and why? Which are the countries with more opportunities for audiovisual arts, in your opinion?

Nowadays, it is possible to learn a lot following digital online courses, but it is always better if somebody guides you. As with everything in life the best way to learn is practice, making mistakes and improving. 

Spain is not the best country for arts, I would say. As far as I know French artists or from other European countries have more grants and support from their governments, but everything is possible if you are passionate about your work.

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The post Interview to Paco Gramaje appeared first on Audiovisualcity.

Miele met à disposition les fichiers STL de ses accessoires pour appareil ménager

Miele, le fabricant allemand d’appareils ménagers et d’équipements commerciaux haut de gamme, a révélé en mai dernier qu’il mettrait gratuitement à disposition les fichiers STL des accessoires pour ses appareils ménagers dans le cadre de son projet 3D4U. Comme vous…

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Interview to VJ Suave

Of course we couldn’t hold ourselves from interviewing this beautifully talented duo of audiovisual artists.

We have never hidden the fact we particularly love the playfulness and delicacy of their AV style. Their street art itinerant approach open the door to a myriad of creative opportunities.

Throughout the years (while keeping fit cycling their AV bikes) they have been engaging with audience of all ages and backgrounds. Here our interview to VJ Suave: enjoy it!

0. How did you meet and decide to work together on this beautiful project?

We met in 2009 in Buenos Aires, and we’ve decided to work together. Cecilia comes from animation and Ygor from painting and drawing. We mixed our best and created VJ Suave.

Interview to VJ Suave - Audiovisual artists
1. How have your techniques advanced since the beginning of your career? What specific technological tools have enabled you to express yourself in a different way because of this?

In the beginning, we took a class on how to use Modul8 and it blew our minds. Cecilia came up with the idea to animate Ygor’s drawings and. Using a small projector, we’ve projected the animations from the window on the street outside.

At that time, we used Adobe Flash, After Effects and Photoshop for animation. Later on we met Maki, and he introduced us to Tagtool, a tool to draw and animate in real time.

The first version of Tagtool was a DIY thing, you needed to have a wacom, arduino, knobs and sliders, ps2 controller, all connected to a computer and a controller box.

You needed to build it yourself, it was a bit complicated. Later on Maki and his crew started to develop Tagtool for iPads and we fell in love with it.

Most of our animations are made frame by frame, using Flash, and this takes time and people to work. Tagtool is easier. It’s a tool that allows us to create drawings and animation by ourselves in a short amount of time.

We also started to investigate virtual reality. In 2017 we’ve created Floresta Encantada / “Enchanted Forest”, an interactive VR experience.

The VR is a very immersive solo experience. You actually believe you are inside a different reality. In Floresta Encantada, together with our crew, we’ve created an experience where participants are teleported to a magical forest where they can interact with both characters and the scenery.

They can play instruments near a bonfire and even drink medicine from a shaman. Each experience is unique as the map is very big. Some people say that they saw a spaceship, others say they had a trip on mushrooms, experiences which are rare in the map. At thee end of the journey all travelers come back to reality with a big smile.

2. Your work with the Suaveciclo is possibly the one thing that you are most well known for in Europe. What was the original thought behind the idea and did you realise how successful the concept would be when it first occurred to you?

In 2011 we created 2 short movies, Run and Homeless. They were very experimental because it was our first time trying to move the projections. The videos have been showcased by MTV and received a great response.

We were happy and we wanted to keep doing moving projections. Instead of keeping on creating videos we wanted to try the performance format, so people on the streets could see it live. 

Instead of a car, we thought of a way that could be affordable to us, first a bicycle, and then finally the tricycle as our moving base to project from.

Interview to VJ Suave - Audiovisual artists

Suaveciclo was created to be able to move our animations throughout the city, bringing joy to everyone who happens to be around. As we don’t use background in the projection the characters look more alive, with a digital graffiti style.

The idea was to take the characters out of the TV screen and make this colorful universe that was inside our heads to merge it with the real world.

When we started VJ Suave back in 2009, we did a lot of research into the VJ world and, at that time, it seemed to us there was no character animation in the VJing scene.

It felt like a perfect gap for us to fit in. From then till now, we keep on doing what we love, what is true for us and we believe anything made like that will always be successful.

3. What technical issues did you encounter when you first came up with the suaveciclo setup? How do you feel about other artists using this idea in their performances?

There have been a lot of adaptations till we got to the actual version of Suaveciclo. First version was very heavy, had small sound speakers and an overall flimsy structure for the projector.

We also had issues as we bought the wrong batteries (now we only use deep cycle batteries). We now have 2 tricycles in São Paulo, one for Ygor and one for Cecilia. What we use now is actually the 5th version.

A few months ago we finally installed an electric battery to help us doing the cycling. It’s also equipped with great sound speakers and a tripod head adapted for the projector.

We like the idea of more visual artists working with images in movement throughout the city. We encourage and help people around the world to build an audiovisual tricycle to express themselves. 

4. Do you remember what first drew you to the audiovisual world? What do you think you would be doing now if you hadn’t discovered the art of video projection?

Ygor: VJ Suave was the starting point for me. Thanks to that I developed my career in animation, creative technology, virtual reality and music. If it wasn’t for it I would still be doing graffiti on the city walls, or maybe working in the forest.

Ceci: I would be applying technology to some other area, maybe holistic health.

5. How is the world of video art in Brazil? Is there a big scene, or is it something quite unusual? Is there anything about your artistic context that you feel influences your work?

Nowadays it is blooming. During the isolation, many audiovisual artists from all over Brazil started to project videos on building walls outside their windows. They have come together and created a group called Projetemos. Thanks to this group, we can share our animations to be projected in different cities. 

Great artists have come out of Brazil like VJ Spetto, VJ Vigas, United VJs, and there’s definitely a scene for vjing and videomapping!

6. What has been the most exhilarating experience or biggest achievement for you? What are you most proud of?

We are proud of having been able to show our art in more than 20 countries at different kinds of audiovisual events: film, street art, animation, music, bike, art technology and light festivals.


If VJ Suave had a little bit of each event, we would be defined by this mix which is something new with technology, animation and movement. 

With Suaveciclo we can create magical moments. We gather people to see the city in a different way, more imaginative. We colour the path with light, expressing love. We think this can open people’s hearts, at least for a second. 

7. A lot of your animation work has an infantil theme with bright colours, organic shapes and friendly faces. Would you say that children are your main audience, or at least, that they are who you most have in mind when you come up with the narratives for your work?

Interview to VJ Suave - Audiovisual artists

We don’t have a specific audience in mind. We create what we are able to express. Sometimes it is naive with simple forms, sometimes it can be more complex. 

Regarding the colours, we have the limitation of the projector. For Suaveciclo performances we carry a 5.500 lumen projector, which is very bright and powerful for a tricycle. However darker colours can be difficult to project. That’s why our colour pallet is always bright, with high contrast and saturation. 

Kids are essential for our performances, because they appreciate magical beings. They want to play with the characters. When they do, adults start to believe in that magical moment too: when kids are yelling and chasing our enchanted characters. 

VJ Suave on Audiovisual City

Website

The post Interview to VJ Suave appeared first on Audiovisualcity.

Porsche et l’utilisation de la fabrication additive

Il y a quelques semaines, le constructeur automobile Porsche présentait des pistons imprimés en 3D pour le moteur de sa Porsche 911 GT2 RS. Une méthode de fabrication qui lui a notamment permis de réduire le poids global de la…

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PrintSyst.ai permet d’imprimer en 3D en toute sécurité grâce à l’IA

PrintSyst.ai est une start-up qui s’est concentrée ces dernières années sur le développement de l’intelligence artificielle pour résoudre le coût important des processus de pré-impression dans la fabrication additive. Aujourd’hui, l’analyse des pièces avant l’impression 3D est une étape cruciale…

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Jonas Denzel Interview – Genius Loci Winners

Par : Marco Savo



Meet the audiovisual artist behind THE SHAPE OF SOUND, projection mapping on the facade of the new Bauhaus Museum in Weimar.

We said it many times: audiovisual is vast and complex, and within audiovisual the different techniques branch out to a myriad of different styles and expressions.

Jonas Denzel here really embraced the think-outside-the-box approach delivering something unique, engaging and playfully attractive.

The projection might not strike at first impact. Nevertheless as soon as you pick up the complex audiovisual interaction and sound design, you realize that you haven’t quite seen anything like that before.

The protagonist is the hand, the starting point of the artistic expression. From a simple gesture the whole audiovisual narrative takes over the building, truly engaging with the audience by inviting them to play along.

As part of our series about the Genius Loci Weimar 2019 winners, our young journalist Marta Minguell asked the creator about his creative process and how he approached the audiovisual event open call.

1. Can you tell us about the interaction design process that is so prominent in this projection mapping artwork?

For me as an artist it is important to let the audience become part of the projection. They should not only look, they should have the chance to actively participate. The interactive part of the projection is based on a musical pattern: it’s called Call and Response.

Basically, one person claps a rhythm and the crowd responds by clapping the same rhythm. In “The Shape of Sound” hands on the façade animate the audience through gestures to participate and rhythmically respond.

It’s a game of call and response. The viewers communicate with their hands. It’s a dialogue between them and the new Bauhaus Museum. By responding to the façade, the audience completes the projection. The rhythms are arranged in a way that they become increasingly difficult.

The simple beginning encourages as many spectators as possible to participate. The increase of rhythmical difficulty is not only challenging but also fun for the audience. It creates a feeling of community.

Genius Loci Winners 2019 - Audiovisual artists
Photo Credits: Henry Sowinski
2. The piece celebrates the power of the gesture as an essential tool to create images and sounds. Which have been your sources of inspiration both in music and visual art for this piece and how did you link them together?

Hands are the oldest tools of mankind. They assist us in our everyday life: to work, to communicate, to make music, etc. The work “The Shape of Sound” is mainly inspired by playing drums.

“Body percussion” is a form of drums, where only hands are used to create rhythms and sounds on the body. I translated this to the new Bauhaus Museum and the projection. One can say it’s now no longer “Body Percussion” but actually “Bauhaus Percussion”.

Sören Schaudel and Jonas Denzel - Audiovisual artists
Photo Credit: Jonas Denzel

The building transforms into an oversized instrument which is played by hands. For me it’s important that not only the visuals but also the sounds refer to the building. This is why the sounds were directly recorded at the new Bauhaus Museum facade.

Together with sound designer Sören Schaudel, sounds and rhythms were recorded on the actual building by knocking on windows, stroking on rough walls, drumming on railings, anything that makes sounds.

These sounds are then arranged in a composition which is an interplay of image and sound. Recording the sounds on the façade is an essential and inspiring part of the design process of the projection.

Genius Loci Winners 2019 - Audiovisual artists
3. Can you share with us your creative approach when submitting an artwork to an open call?

First of all, I study the building, the architecture and its history. I then take a close look at the facade and its architectural structure to imagine what kind of musical instrument the building could be transformed into and how it could sound like.

In the specific case of the new Bauhaus Museum, the fine horizontal architectural lines on the facade were used to create a keyboard which then transforms the building into a huge piano played by over-dimensional hands.

Genius Loci Weimar

Interview to Genius Loci Weimar

The post Jonas Denzel Interview – Genius Loci Winners appeared first on Audiovisualcity.

ruestungsschmie.de and Soundselektor Interview – Genius Loci Winners

Par : Marco Savo



Meet the audiovisual artists behind REMAKE³, projection mapping on the facade of the German National Theatre (DNT) in Weimar.

ruestungsschmie.de are absolute masters of the video mapping technique while Soundselektor crafts unique soundtracks intertwined with the visual narrative.

The audiovisual duo has a very analytical and technical approach to the audiovisual art. Their aim is to get as close as possible to the architecture and its role within the urban environment.

The result is a mind-blowing explosion of structural elements hitting hard on the viewer’s senses. Every single element is visually enhanced and undergoes numerous levels of abstractions, constantly oscillating between the architectural and the geometrical.

We had the chance to see their artwork NUCLEUS³ live at Signal Festival 2018. An audiovisual thunderstorm infusing every element of the facade with vibrant life: another of their masterpiece!

As part of our series about the Genius Loci Weimar 2019 winners, our young journalist Marta Minguell asked the creators about their creative process and how they approached the audiovisual event open call.

1. Can you tell us about how you constructed the abstract story-line for the visual narrative and the relationship with the sound experimentation?

The graphics are buildings on top of each other, they slowly evolve from simple to complex. The journey is the destination. We visualize our work-process as a part of our creation.

Our work is multi-layered. Each layer describes a fragment of a topic. By adding the layers on top of each other we create a multi-topic collage. 

In the first layer, the absolute beginning, we chose the main “topics” to work on graphically. In this case the architecture, the facade composition and the historical and urban context of the Deutsches Nationaltheater Weimar.

Being architects, we believe that the building plays the part of the protagonist. Our main instruments for the visual narrative creation are building plans, sections, 3D-models, satellite images, 2D and 3D geodata, plans and models of the surroundings and finally the landscape of the city itself.

Genius Loci Winners 2019 - Audiovisual artists
Photo Credits: Oliver Blum

In the second layer we reflect upon the historical, political and social impact of the Nationaltheater in the past, present and future. With this in mind as well as the current political and social development in Germany and Europe we decided we have to make some kind of statement, in using clear font. Finally, the categorical imperative (Kant) and its analogies found in the different world religions seemed to be the right answer.

The third layer is the sound design. Obviously it is important for composing the atmosphere in the visuals. We try to envision what will happen visually. We start working in 2D and 3D.

As soon as we have a rough cut, we send it to Jarii van Gohl / Soundselektor (our sound magician). Then he works on the sound composition and sends it back to us. Then the ping-pong-game starts, by sending back and forth. This goes on until we achieve the desired result. 

2. The projection mapping features a great variety of textures and patterns. How did you create them and what tools did you use?

We use very different techniques to create our visuals. We create 3D models from architectural drawings and Geo-data. We also use 2D video footage to create 3D objects importing them in 3D programs. A technique we have been constantly working on and refined over the years.

We also use different techniques offered by video editing software like DaVinci Resolve and others. For 3D we mostly use Cinema 4D and some known and unknown Plugins.

Genius Loci Winners 2019 - Audiovisual artists
3. Can you share with us your creative approach when submitting an artwork to an open call?

It really depends on the task. First of all we analyze the object and its context. Typically, it is a building. We look at the facade, its specific details, patterns and composition and try to find plans and sections of the building.

We then look at the building’s history, the location within the city and the surroundings. Google Earth is our good friend there. When we can, we try to visit the city and see everything live.

Often there are given topics. Thereafter we start the conversation. Talking and sketching are the main instruments here. We shout out ideas and discuss them. This process leads to new ideas, which are also discussed and the wheel begins to turn. Eventually we find a concept which we can all agree on. 

Then the typing starts. We try to formulate our ideas the way an “outside” person would interpret it. Meanwhile the visualization starts. We try to squeeze in as much concept as possible within little pictures.

Finally we work on matching the text and the visuals, which is always a good test for the concept itself. If we cannot connect the written words with the images we created, we know there is a bug and we know what to do. Finally we add some artistic flavors and statements.

Then we win the call, the game begins and a new discussion starts. We love it!

Genius Loci Weimar

Interview to Genius Loci Weimar

ruestungsschmie.de

The post ruestungsschmie.de and Soundselektor Interview – Genius Loci Winners appeared first on Audiovisualcity.

Laura Seitz and Daniel Pitts Interview – Genius Loci Winners

Par : Marco Savo



Meet the audiovisual artists behind REVERSE IMAGINATION, projection mapping on the facade of the MON AMI cultural centre in Weimar.

Laura Seitz and Daniel Pitts’ audiovisual work stands out for its detailed storytelling and figurative approach.

Rather than opting for simply highlighting the architecture, they have decided to tell us the story behind the construction of the building, through a captivating audiovisual narrative.

As part of our series about the Genius Loci Weimar 2019 winners, our young journalist Marta Minguell asked the creators about their creative process and how they approached the audiovisual event open call.

1. What are the main references that inspired you to create the “Reverse Imagination” audiovisual narrative?

In order to start the foundations of the building, the people of Weimar had to drain parts of a swamp located in this area. Without that effort the construction of the MON AMI would not have been possible.

We found this tedious task to be a good symbolic starting point for a broader approach to the theme: individuals working together to open up space for their community.

The ground, that otherwise would have been inaccessible or even hostile to life, became fertile. Ideas that couldn’t be previously heard can now be shared and developed.

The whole building can be perceived as a foundation stone for decades of dialogue, cultural and artistic expression, political engagement and countless untold personal stories that otherwise would have not been possible.

We reenacted that progress, but not in a historically accurate way. Instead we opted for a fantastic reinterpretation of the construction of the building. Abstract beings finding themselves back in the former swamp surrounded by ruins and rubble.

They are there to rebuild an alternative MON AMI, revealing more of the
inner nature of the place than the facade might be able to show on its
own.

Laura Seits and Daniel Pitts - Audiovisual artists
Photo Credits: Henry Sowinski
2. Can you tell us about the techniques you used and the creative process you followed to create this animation mapping piece?

We wanted to put emphasis on the audiovisual story telling in this work right from the beginning. So we did a fair amount of writing work and concept art, to develop a solid narrative structure, that is engaging and suitable for the site.

Furthermore we had to consider the different spectators experiences, due to the wide range of viewing angles and visual obstacles, like trees in front of the building.

Since our story evolved around the fictitious rebuild of MON AMI, we tried not only to superimpose imagery onto the real world structure.

Instead we referenced it and played with its spatial perception to immerse a viewer even further by forcing perspectives and vanishing points.

While the composition of the different elements, their movements and lighting was done in a digital 3d environment, almost all visible surfaces were hand drawn, scanned and then integrated into the scene.

This mixture of analog and digital technology enabled intriguing animated movement, dynamic lighting and complex scene setup. But it was also providing the necessary detail, texture and imperfection that created a natural and tangible look, even at the scale of such a mapping piece.

Genius Loci Winners 2019 - Audiovisual artists
3. Can you share with us your creative approach when submitting an artwork to an open call?

Genius Loci Weimar 2019 was the first video mapping project that we did of that kind. Visiting the audiovisual event in recent years, gave us an impression of the unique mood in the streets of Weimar during those nights.

Entire areas of the city seemed to be immersed in a dream-like state. Yet all the locations featured different atmospheres achieved in many different ways.Inspired by that we were eager to create our own approach reflecting our interests and skill sets.

For the submission we wanted to create an artwork that well portrays
our stylistic decisions as well as giving a glimpse of the narrative
structure we planned for the full animation piece.

At the same time, we were trying to figure out whether our ideas could work on a medium that we only knew from a spectator’s point of view back then.

Genius Loci Weimar

Interview to Genius Loci Weimar

The post Laura Seitz and Daniel Pitts Interview – Genius Loci Winners appeared first on Audiovisualcity.

#Startup 3D : le logiciel de CASTOR réduit les délais et coûts d’impression 3D

Notre startup 3D du mois CASTOR nous vient directement d’Israël et a développé une solution logicielle afin d’aider les industriels à réduire leurs délais et leurs coûts de fabrication en impression 3D. Son objectif est de tirer profit de tous…

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Nik Huber Guitars mise sur l’impression 3D d’un métal amorphe pour ses guitares

Nik Huber Guitars (NHG) est une entreprise qui fabrique des guitares électriques depuis plusieurs années maintenant. Elle s’est récemment tournée vers la fabrication additive à travers une collaboration avec Heraeus, un groupe allemand spécialisé dans les métaux précieux. Ensemble, ils…

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Rencontre avec les créateurs de PRVOK, la maison flottante imprimée en 3D

Il y a quelques semaines, nous vous présentions la première maison aux murs imprimés en 3D érigée en République tchèque, pas n’importe laquelle d’ailleurs puisqu’elle est flottante ! Vous le savez sûrement, les maisons imprimées en 3D sont de plus…

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Interview to Genius Loci Weimar

Par : Marco Savo

We have supported Genius Loci Weimar and promoted their open call for audiovisual artists since their early start.

We felt now was the perfect time to interview the organizers of the projection mapping festival. One of the fastest growing audiovisual events in Europe. (German version below)

1. Can you tell us about the history, concept ans goals of Genius Loci Weimar?

The history of Genius Loci Weimar began 8 years ago, in 2012, when, as part of various regional development initiatives, we were looking for a concept that could combine modern media and historical heritage.

This is how the Genius Loci Weimar Festival came into being, initially on a smaller scale, which has since developed into an event with up to 50,000 visitors annually. The concept has always been to deal with the “spirit of the place” and its individual history, the “Genius Loci”.

We want to achieve several things with GLW: Always present is the goal of presenting aesthetically pleasing and high-quality artworks in Weimar. In addition, we also want to create a positive public and to address audiences of all ages and backgrounds throughout the festival.

As already mentioned, the “Genius Loci” is the focus of our artistic works. It is therefore also the goal to discuss history and to stimulate historical-cultural reflection, which certainly also has political and social aspects.
Another goal is to create and develop our own format, a brand that can provide a framework for the production of artistic works in this field.

The projection mapping scene is still quite young. Visibility, communication and networking are therefore also important concerns of our festival. Especially through the programme formats TALK, CLUB and LAB. There, in the LAB, the support and encouragement of young talents is increasingly taking place.

The AV media are to be further established as an art form and artistic format and to move away from the “avant-garde” or even “nerd corner”, in which they are still often located. To emphasize their potential as an aesthetic direction with different artistic styles and tastes is the goal of Genius Loci Weimar.



2. The festival advocates the importance of video mapping as an audiovisual tool to deliver relevant contents, rather than mere entertainment gimmick. How do you think GLW have been impacting the relationship between the community and the architectonic heritage of the city?



Thanks to the festival, a considerable exchange takes place every year on several levels within the city. The citizens of Weimar have become real “fans” of the festival and its formats and are curiously looking forward to seeing which new locations will be played at each year and can be experienced in new ways.

Thus, in addition to very prominent buildings such as the National Theatre or the Herderkirche in the city centre, the Ilmpark and a squatted house in Gerberstraße have already been in the spotlight.

Especially at controverse locations, such as Gerberstraße 3, exciting exchanges can arise: There, the “bourgeoisie” became observer of the usually sceptically eyed façade of the squatted house, the inhabitants of the house project became hosts at the same time – also for the otherwise avoided “establishment”. An exciting situation for everyone, which can only arise during a live event and on-site.

Genius Loci Weimar 2015 Winner - Audiovisual Event

However, in any case, reflection is always encouraged: exchange and examination of past times and other lifestyles. The buildings also appear in new contexts, the library was once filled with fictitious visions or the theatre was shown as an important place of democracy. The selection and the type of performance should always have a very specific effect.

The fact that the concept is sustainable can be seen from the fact that other projection festivals are following up, launching similar strategies or even asking for a transferable concept.

In the end, the awareness for places and cities is always sensitized by the unique, site-specific spectacles.



3. GLW Open Call is the core of the festival. Can you explain the complex decision process you undertake every year to award the three prizes? Are there any project that have been particularly relevant for you in the past editions?


The audiovisual event starts already in spring with the publication of our Open Call and the announcement of the three competition buildings. A prize money of 15.000 Euro per building is awarded and we receive applications with artistic projects from all over the world during the competition period.

At the end of the competition, the applications will be judged by a jury of experts, while the public will also be able to vote at this early stage to decide who will perform their work in late summer.

During the past eight festival editions, a wide range of artistic styles were chosen as competition winners. Exciting, for example, was last year’s masterfully implemented, seemingly interactive audiovisual performance by Jonas Denzel on the façade of the newly opened Bauhaus Museum in Weimar.



Of 2016, the combination of live performance and video projection on a surface of water from Dieselqueen is also remembered.



Or the already mentioned mapping with the title “Grain Metal Punk” by VJZARIA on the façade of the squatted house in Gerberstraße.



4. During these uncertain times many audiovisual events decided to implement hybrid or online formats. Can you tell us about GLW position in the current scenario?


Genius Loci Weimar continues to believe in the presence and magic of live events. We continue to believe in video mapping as a unique, ephemeral and sensual event, accompanied by overwhelming sound and an immense size that can be experienced collectively in public space. This is why we continue to focus on the live event on-site.


5. How do you see Genius Loci Weimar in the next 10 years?


Genius Loci Weimar aims to further extend its constant growth path of recent years. As a festival and brand, GLW will continue to grow in breadth, but also in depth.

The reflective formats such as the relatively new TALK will continue to be expanded and refined. AV hybrids as a stage format, as has been the case with AV cinema in recent years, are also to be further developed and refined.

In the middle and long term, closer cooperation with universities is also conceivable, for example in the form of the creation of a new institute or similar. However, the core will always be the video and its connection to the historical heritage of the city!


Discover more about the audiovisual event




GERMAN VERSION

Können Sie uns etwas über die Geschichte, das Konzept und die Ziele von Genius Loci Weimar erzählen?

Angefangen hat die Geschichte von Genius Loci Weimar bereits vor 8 Jahren, im Jahr 2012. Im Rahmen verschiedener Initiativen zur Regionalentwicklung suchten wir nach einem Konzept, das es schafft, moderne Medien und historisches Erbe miteinander zu verbinden. Dabei entstand das Genius Loci Weimar Festival, zunächst in kleinerem Umfang, das sich inzwischen zu einer Veranstaltung mit bis zu 50.000 Besucher*innen jährlich entwickelt hat. Das Konzept war dabei schon immer die Auseinandersetzung mit dem „Geist des Ortes“ und seiner individuellen Geschichte, dem „Genius Loci“ eben.

Wir möchten mit GLW mehre Dinge erreichen: Immer präsent ist natürlich das Ziel, ästhetisch ansprechende und hochwertige Kunstwerke in Weimar zur Aufführung zu bringen. Dazu kommt aber auch der Anspruch, eine positive Öffentlichkeit zu schaffen und mit dem Festival milieu- und altersübergreifend Zuschauer*innen anzusprechen.

Wie schon eben gesagt steht der „Genius Loci“ im Mittelpunkt unserer künstlerischen Arbeiten. Es ist also auch Ziel, Geschichte zu thematisieren und zu einer historisch-kulturellen Reflexion anzuregen, die durchaus auch politische und gesellschaftliche Facetten in sich trägt.

Ein weiteres Ziel ist das Erschaffen und Weiterentwickeln eines eigenen Formats, einer Marke, die der Produktion von künstlerischen Arbeiten in diesem Bereich einen Rahmen geben kann.

Die Videomapping-Szene ist noch recht jung. Sichtbarkeit, Kommunikation und Vernetzung sind also auch wichtige Anliegen unseres Festivals, insbesondere durch die Veranstaltungsteile TALK, CLUB und LAB. Dort, im LAB, findet auch verstärkt die Nachwuchsförderung statt. Die AV-Medien sollen als Kunstform und als künstlerisches Format noch weiter etabliert werden und heraus aus der „Avantgarde-“ oder sogar „Nerd-Ecke“, in der sie noch teilweise verortet werden. Ihr Potenzial als eine ästhetische Richtung mit unterschiedlichen künstlerischen Stilen und Geschmacksrichtungen herauszustellen, ist Ziel von Genius Loci Weima

Das Festival befürwortet die Bedeutung von Video-Mapping als audiovisuelles Instrument zur Vermittlung relevanter Inhalte und nicht als bloßen Unterhaltungsgag. Wie hat GLW Ihrer Meinung nach die Beziehung zwischen der Gemeinschaft und dem architektonischen Erbe der Stadt beeinflusst?

Innerhalb der Stadt findet dank des Festivals jedes Jahr aufs Neue ein erheblicher Austausch auf mehreren Ebenen statt. Die Weimarer*innen sind inzwischen zu richtigen „Fans“ des Festivals und seiner Formate geworden und erwarten gespannt, welche neuen Orte jedes Jahr bespielt und auf neue Weise erfahren werden können.

So war neben sehr prominenten Gebäuden wie dem Nationaltheater oder der Herderkirche in der Innenstadt auch schon der Ilmpark und ein besetztes Haus in der Gerberstraße im Rampenlicht.

Gerade an kontroversen Orten, wie beispielsweise der Gerberstraße 3, können spannende Begegnungen entstehen: Das „Bürgertum“ wurde dort zum Betrachter der sonst so skeptisch beäugten Fassade des besetzten Hauses, die Bewohnerinnen des Hausprojekts wurden gleichzeitig zu Gastgeberinnen – auch für das sonst gemiedene „Establishment“. Eine spannende Situation für alle, die so nur im Moment eines Live-Events vor Ort entstehen kann.

Auf jeden Fall wird aber immer zur Reflexion angeregt: Austausch und Auseinandersetzung mit vergangenen Zeiten und anderen Lebenswelten. Auch die Gebäude treten in neuen Kontexten auf, die Bibliothek wurde einmal mit fiktiven Gebäudevisionen bespielt oder das Theater als Ort der Demokratie thematisiert. Die Auswahl und die Art der Bespielung sollen dabei immer eine ganz bestimmte Wirkung erzielen.

Dass das Konzept trägt, sieht man auch daran, dass andere Projektionsfestivals nachlegen und ähnliche Konzepte an den Start bringen oder sogar nach einem übertragbaren Konzept anfragen.

Letztlich wird immer das Bewusstsein für Orte und Städte durch die einmaligen, ortsgebundenen Spektakel sensibilisiert.

Der GLW Open Call ist das Herzstück des Festivals. Können Sie den komplexen Entscheidungsprozess erklären, den Sie jedes Jahr für die Vergabe der drei Preise durchführen? Gibt es Projekte, die für Sie in den vergangenen Ausgaben besonders relevant waren?

Das Festival beginnt bereits im Frühjahr mit der Veröffentlichung unseres Open Calls und der Bekanntgabe der drei Wettbewerbsgebäude. Pro Gebäude ist ein Preisgeld von 15.000 Euro ausgelobt und uns erreichen im Wettbewerbszeitraum Bewerbungen mit künstlerischen Projekten aus der ganzen Welt ein.

Nach Ende werden die Bewerbungen zum einen von einer Expert*innenjury beurteilt, und zum anderen kann auch das Publikum bereits an dieser frühen Stelle mit Hilfe des Public Votes mitbestimmen, wer im Spätsommer seinen Wettbewerbsbeitrag zur Aufführung bringen wird.

Während der vergangenen acht Festivaleditionen konnte eine große Bandbreite an künstlerischen Stilen als Wettbewerbssieger*innen gekürt werden. Spannend war zum Beispiel im letzten Jahr die gekonnt umgesetzte, scheinbar interaktive, audiovisuelle Performance von Jonas Denzel auf der Fassade des neu eröffneten Bauhaus-Museums in Weimar.

Aus 2016 ist aber auch die Kombination aus Live-Performance und Video-Projektion auf eine Wasserfläche von Dieselqueen in Erinnerung geblieben.

Oder das schon angesprochene Mapping mit dem Titel „Grain Metal Punk“ von VJZARIA an der Fassade des besetzten Hauses in der Gerberstraße.

In diesen unsicheren Zeiten haben sich viele audiovisuelle Veranstaltungen entschieden, hybride oder Online-Formate einzusetzen. Können Sie uns über die Position des GLW im aktuellen Szenario berichten?

Genius Loci Weimar glaubt auch weiterhin an die Präsenz und die Magie des Live-Events. An das Videomapping als einmaliges, vergängliches und sinnliches Ereignis, begleitet von überwältigendem Sound und einer immensen Größe, das kollektiv im Stadtraum erfahren werden kann. Deshalb fokussieren wir uns auch weiterhin auf die Live-Veranstaltung vor Ort.

Wie sehen Sie Genius Loci Weimar in den nächsten 10 Jahren?

Genius Loci Weimar will seinen konstanten Wachstumspfad der letzten Jahre weiter ausbauen. Als Festival und Marke soll weiter in die Breite, aber auch in die Tiefe gewachsen werden. Die reflektiven Formate wie etwa der noch recht neue TALK sollen auch weiterhin ausgebaut und verfeinert werden. Auch die AV-Hybride als Bühnenformat, wie beim AV-KINO in den letzten Jahren schon geschehen, soll noch weiter verfeinert werden.
Mittel- und Langfristig ist aber auch eine engere Kooperation mit Hochschulen, etwa in Form der Schaffung eines eigenen Instituts oder ähnliches denkbar

Kern wird aber immer das Video und seine Verknüpfung mit dem historischen Erbe der Stadt bleiben!

The post Interview to Genius Loci Weimar appeared first on Audiovisualcity.

SUAT: behind the DJ who walks for miles carrying and mixing on an XDJ-RX

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Par : Marco Savo

1.YOU HAVE A VERY VARIED, YET DISTINCTIVE AESTHETIC THAT CAN BE EASILY RECOGNIZED, BUT AT THE SAME TIME, A LITTLE DIFFICULT TO CLASSIFY! WHAT WERE YOUR EARLY GRAPHIC INFLUENCES/INSPIRATIONS AND WHAT ELEMENTS OR EXPERIENCES HAVE BEEN KEY TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF YOUR STYLE?

 

Hi guys! Thank you for your questions and your interest in my work. Let’s get started! Here my main influences:

In the 80s: whilst growing up in France, I was very inspired by the vast amount of Japanese anime on TV, especially the Cobra series (funny that it was just on kids TV back then in France, where it would be rated 12 or 15 here in UK now) and films like Videodrome, Nightmare on Elm Street, Evil Dead 2, 2001, The Thing, Altered States, Blazing Saddles, Monty Python films and such like.

Weirdcore_Audiovisual_Artist_Interview1

In the later 80’s & 90’s whilst living in different parts of the UK during my student years, I was really into rave graphics and visuals like
Stakker Humanoid and FSOL.

I was massively into MTV’s Aeon Flux series and non verbal films like Baraka, Koyananskatsti, Atlantis and such like. The Day Today  / Brass eye have been quite important as well in terms of absurdity and “OTT-ness”, especially the Brass eye Infographics. Then in late 90’s & early 00s once I moved to London I was massively into Ryoji Ikeda / Dumb Type / Semi-conductor Films / Ukawa.

In terms of key experiences, I’d say it was seeing Daft Punk live multiple times in the mid 90’s & their Audiovisual show in the 1997 tour. That was definitely the main experiences that pushed me to do what I do in the audiovisual world.

It was like a “smack in the face”. So bold, minimal and sync-ed to the music, it totally blew me away. I remember thinking back then, I wanted to blow people away in the same way someday.

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2. IN YOUR WORK WE CAN SEE A BIG VARIETY OF IMAGE PROCESSING RESULTS, DOES THIS EXPERIMENTATION GO HAND IN HAND WITH AN EXPERIMENTATION OF THE TOOLS YOU USE TO CREATE THE VISUALS AS WELL?

 

Good question, that I’m not sure how to answer as I don’t really think about it in that way. I’d say I very much differentiate my live & studio work. To me, my live visuals are technically made in similar ways to how my friends make music.

I position myself in the same category as lighting/laser designers, in a sense that I’m there merely complementing/enhancing the audio experience. As in my studio work I very much try to recreate the kinda vibe of an anime intro or 80s music video, which in my opinion were far more entertaining. For me, it’s all about visual impact and entertaining the audience.

  • Weirdcore_Audiovisual_Artist_Interview2

3. HOW WOULD YOU DEFINE “AUDIOVISUAL ART” AND HOW DO YOU POSITION YOURSELF IN THIS SPECIFIC CULTURE?

 

This is a tricky question for me, as I find it hard to categorize anything I see on my computer screen or at a party as art. For me it’s more like graphics or entertainment. Call me old fashioned but for it to be Art is has to be in an art context (whatever that is), and as my work isn’t in galleries or such like (yet) i don’t really consider myself as an artist.

Actually I find the words art/artists are used way too sparingly in this day and age, so I’m not really sure as to where I fit in all this. I’d rather not think about it and just carry on doing my thing & let other people define me as they see fit…

  • Weirdcore_Audiovisual_Artist_Interview5
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4. YOUR CAREER DEVELOPED ACROSS DIFFERENT FIELDS AND MEDIA SUCH AS ADVERTISING, FASHION, ELECTRONIC MUSIC, VIDEO CLIPS, AND SO ON. CAN YOU TELL US ABOUT THE CONCEPTUAL AND AESTHETIC LINKS CONNECTING ALL YOUR VERY DIVERSE PROJECTS??

 

I’m very much into specific/custom made/location-based designs. My ideas tend to be finding a way to best fit the “where” and “what”. My concepts are very driven by discussions (or lack of) with the artist/clients, which is why my work tends to vary in style (or quality, if the client/artist has too little input or dictates too much)

5. YOU HAVE WORKED WITH MANY DIFFERENT MUSICIANS AND SINGERS THROUGHOUT THE YEARS. COULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR CREATIVE PROCESS OF VISUALIZING A SOUNDSCAPE AND THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN WORKING WITH ABSTRACT CONTENTS LIKE ELECTRONIC MUSIC AND THE MORE EXPLICIT NARRATIVE OF POP AND HIP HOP CULTURE?

 

Firstly I figure the possibilities and limitations and work within those boundaries, then I discuss with artist/client to figure a rough direction to aim for, it then it generally snowballs from there.

I generally try to deliver what the artist/client & target audience wants, but not necessarily what they expect, so I tend to avoid the obvious options.

I don’t think I approach a project that differently depending on what genre of music it is. I just try and do whatever feels right for that category of music, BUT the workflow is vastly different depending of the type of artists they are.

Some artist are way more approachable than others regardless their music genres and when I can bounce ideas back and forth with them that is when I can go deep into what they truly want and get the best results. I can’t say the same when there’s a sea of management/label/producers between me and the artist.

It’s fair to the results are far more fruitful when I work with artists who don’t take themselves too seriously as I’m not a yes-man nor my specialty is making people like prim & proper.

READ MORE ABOUT THE AUDIOVISUAL ARTIST

The post AVCity interviews Weirdcore appeared first on Audiovisualcity.

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How I Play: Satori

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The post How I Play: Satori appeared first on DJ TechTools.

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