Collanews

🔒
❌ À propos de FreshRSS
Il y a de nouveaux articles disponibles, cliquez pour rafraîchir la page.
À partir d’avant-hierAudiovisualcity » Audiovisualcity | Audiovisualcity

INFINITE SPACE – Miami Artech House: 13 June – 6 September 2020

Par : Marco Savo



We have put feelers out fetching information about audiovisual events happening in physical spaces, to understand how venues and organisers are coping with the social distancing guidelines.

A lot has been happening virtually since the Covid 19 outbreak but very few actual events have taken place with plenty of cancellations, endangering the already fragile audiovisual culture ecosystem.

Well, Miami Artech House is kicking off with a bang, showcasing the art exhibition of one of the most recognized audiovisual artists worldwide: Refik Anadol.

Refik Anadol immersive installations allow us to leap into an universe of data, featuring a matrix that swallows everything around until there is nothing left outside of it.

His overwhelming data sculptures foresee a post-digital architectural future in which there are no more non-digital realities. A world where man and machine are embedded within each other.

Infinite Space is the first major retrospective of the work of award-winning, Los-Angeles-based, Turkish-born artist Refik Anadol. The immersive data installation invites visitors to open their senses to the endless transformation and infinite possibilities at the intersection of man and machine.

Refik Anadol - Audiovisual Artist

One of the greatest eighteenth-century English artists William Blake famously said, “if the doors of perception were cleansed, everything would appear to man as it is – infinite.”  Infinite Space is a collection of works that revisits Blake’s statement and seeks to cleanse the doors of perception with the tools available to twenty-first-century artists.

The exhibition explores memories and dreams through the mind of a machine by using data sets ranging from human memories, photographs of Mars, cultural archives and sea surface activity as data sculptures and digital paintings.

Book Tickets

Website

Facebook | Twitter | Instagram

The post INFINITE SPACE – Miami Artech House: 13 June – 6 September 2020 appeared first on Audiovisualcity.

Emerging Digital Artists Award

Par : Marco Savo

DEADLINE: 15 JUNE 2020

The open call is addressed to audiovisual artists resident in Canada within 5 years of their artistic career.

This is a great chance for emerging digital artists to showcase their artworks, expand their networking and further their experimentation within the digital arts.

The Emerging Digital Artists Award (EDAA) is Canada’s award for critical experimentation in digital media. The award consists of $5,000 for the winner, and $1,000 for four finalists, as well as a group exhibition.

Since 2015, the EDAA has been promoting artists working within virtual space, by seeking submissions that push us in new directions, and challenge us to see the world through a different screen.

READ MORE AND APPLY

BUY US A COFFEE?BUY US A COFFEE?

The post Emerging Digital Artists Award appeared first on Audiovisualcity.

What digital did next: Digital Arts and Social Distancing

Par : Marco Savo



How digital arts can unlock value and opportunity in a socially distanced cultural sector?

Marco Savo from Audiovisual City and Kate Rolfe from The Revels Office have never met in person. Theirs is a true digital relationship born of the pandemic.

Cultural consultants who met over Zoom to explore where their world’s crossed-over, and how their mix of experience could help artists, freelancers, and the arts sector as a whole to combat this unsettling time.

Audiovisual City is a digital magazine that promotes and supports audiovisual artists and events worldwide. Connecting hundreds of digital artists from across the world, it is the go-to place for inspiration and information when it comes to the application of digital technologies in artistic expression.

The Revels Office is a cultural consultancy who specialises in finding new revenue for the arts, advising organisations on commercial opportunities and uniting them with funding partners who value the unique, high quality content that only the cultural sector can produce. Together with a network of consultants -The Catalyst Network – the team at The Revels Office manage a range of projects at the intersection between arts and commerce.

Together with a multi-disciplinary group of experts who all have touch-points with digital arts experiences, Audiovisual City and The Revels Office ran a workshop to explore what role digital arts projects could play in the future of arts organisations.

At a time when the sector is anxiously remodelling their core operations to survive months of low visitor numbers, reduced income through established business lines, and a new, uneasy socially distanced experience, we wanted to investigate what untapped value digital arts might offer.

We share with you here a summary of our findings, designed to inspire you at a critical time, to offer valuable ideas to consider in your re-modelling plans, and to decipher the role that digital can play in a sector based almost entirely on live and tangible experiences…


Case Study: Enjambre Cellular

Developed by Mónica Rikić, Enjambre Celular is a project created and designed specifically for the Medialab-Prado interactive façade.

It is a collective strategy game in which different levels and challenges must be overcome, based on the idea of a labyrinth. Controlled externally by passers-by, Enjambre Celular offers an example of a pandemic-proof artistic installation.


Case Study: Distances

Developed by Scenocosme, In this installation, two people in two separate physical spaces are filmed in real time by two devices.

They are invited to have contact virtually within the same image, bringing them together face to face. The head-to-head image created by the software is trying to constantly reduce the proxemic distance between the two people, creating unique and ephemeral meetings with the other and making a connection even when physically apart.

  • Distances Scenocosme Audiovisual Artists
  • Distances Audiovisual Artwork


Digital art vs digital design.

To make informed choices about the use of digital, it is important to understand the distinction of digital art as an artform in its own right, and digital design as a tool for engagement.

Put simply – do you need to move your live content online for commercial, audience or safety reasons, or do you want to create a new interpretation of your content that will explore your stories in an entirely new way? Neither choice is right or wrong, but it will impact the outcomes you achieve, as well as the process you go through.

“The importance of concept is key; you must start with your concept and then chose the technology to match”

Hayley Cantor

What digital art and digital design have in common is their ability to bridge between traditional cultural content and modern, digitally aware audiences, and allow people to fully interact with the arts.

No solution is quicker for overcoming an image of being elitist, static or uninteresting than a digital initiative, so long as it is done well, has a clear purpose and audience, and so long as it incorporates some kind of live and/or unique element that ensures the digital is not simply a mimic of the live experience.

While digital design is fantastic for bringing to life educational and historic content, and is arguably simpler for translating to an online platform, where digital arts stands out is in the sensorial, emotive experience that they can create, lasting longer in people’s memories and creating a sense of community and harmony even if you encounter the art alone.

Digital arts is the perfect solution for a hybrid cultural offering, connecting those experiencing it online and those there in person, allowing for smaller, safer groups to pass through it without losing the commercial, social and artistic benefits of scale.

Case Study: Virtual Archive.

Virtual Archive is a 3D, computer-generated environment open to interactive exploration by single users.

Via a VR headset, the user flies through a 3D data-point cloud formed, visualizing more than 1,700,000 documents present in SALT Research archive collections. Refik Anadol’s installation was displayed as an extension to the artist’s Archive Dreaming project.

  • Digital Archive - Audiovisual Artist
  • Digital Archive - Audiovisual Artwork


Case Study: Natural History Museum of Valparaisa.

In the Introductory Room at Natural History Museum of Valparaíso, Chile, visitors meet an installation of naturalistic illustrations of flora and fauna of the region, highlighting the work of Claudio Gay among others.

Developed by Delight Lab, this project was realised in partnership with the SUMO design and museum office for DIBAM.

  • Delight Lab - Museum Valparaiso - Audiovisual Artwork
  • Delight Lab - Museum Valparaiso - Audiovisual Artists


It’s time to set the price.

The price we have paid for the vast amounts of thrilling, comforting and informative digital content that has been dispersed throughout the global lock-down, is the expectation that digital means free.

Digital comes with development costs, artist costs and new software and/or infrastructure requirements, among other operational demands. Digital content is by no means free to create, and so why is it presented as free to consume? There are two ways of looking at this dilemma.

• Option 1 is to embrace the non-financial value that going digital presents: reaching new and much larger audiences, collecting insightful data, offering educational and social benefits, and adopting new methods in storytelling and human connection.

In this way there is still value, there are no barriers to audiences engaging with you, and you can use data and reach to collaborate with new funding partners, upsell products and services, and request donations wherever possible.

In this way we have seen a really positive response during the pandemic, with culture-lovers willingly paying for online experiences, seeing this as a charitable donation to save something they love rather than a charge for valuable entertainment. However this has not yet translated into a consistent approach that audiences and funders recognise, or indeed made up the huge gap in revenue that arts organisations face.

• Option 2 is to revaluate and recommunicate the value of the digital experience, and set up platforms that give organisations the option to charge.

Given the high value outlined by option 1, it seems reasonable that – just like the expectation to pay for the cinema or a gig – you will have to pay to participate in digital cultural experiences. This transactional view may not sit well alongside arts experiences that are traditionally free, such as museum-entry, but this demonstrates the opportunity presented by digital arts as opposed to digital design; by creating a new experience on a new platform, arts organisations can create something of value to their audiences (and new ones), one which better warrants a participation charge.

Ultimately this is an argument of supply and demand, but what we endorse is a collective reassessment of how and when to charge for digital experiences, thereby protecting arts organisations and artists from giving away valuable content for free, especially when for a time this might be one of their only viable sources of revenue.


Case Study: Fulldome Festival

The oldest full dome projection festival has been held virtually for the first time this year due to the pandemic, charging a ticket price for the online experience. A courageous decision from the organisers who decided to go full steam ahead, offering a 360 view of the festival using VR headsets.

Case Study: Mutek San Francisco, Nexus Experience

Mutek is one of the top audiovisual events worldwide, born in Montreal and then expanded through an international network. The San Francisco edition has been online this year with their ‘Nexus Experience’, hosting live AV performers on two stages, offering digital galleries, online workshops, and ‘viewing party’ film screenings. The event was free and open to donations, with 100% of the festival proceeds going directly to the artists.

  • MutekSF_Audiovisual_Event
  • Fulldome_Festival_Logo_Audiovisual_Event


Demystifying the digital process (and budget).

Digital arts experiences are impactful and memorable no matter what their size, from single exhibition displays through to city-wide festivals. While they can be huge and expensive, often a digital intervention is as cost-effective as a live experience due to the flexibility of the format, recouping investment costs over a far longer lifespan.

For those who want to consider digital as part of their future plans, digital arts producer Steph Clarke shares some considerations:

• Once a digital installation, artwork or exhibition is installed, it can often run 24/7 with minimal staffing and low running costs. Not only can this make valuable budget savings, it also accommodates far higher audience numbers over time, and can easily be adapted to allow for social distancing measures.

• Digital works can easily have their content re-purposed to suit different objectives. Content can be refreshed regularly to suit seasonality, adapted for VIP or stakeholder events, and used for advertising purposes if required.

• It is relatively easy to scale digital work depending upon size of venue or audience size, meaning this approach can be considered for a variety of projects, places and budgets.

• Digital can be used to extend and enhance audience engagement before and after the event/exhibition itself, through engagement online and via apps, creating more touchpoints with your intended audience and opportunities to capture insights and data.

• By digitalising the content for a digital installation, you are simultaneously archiving it too, preserving it for future generations and achieving important cost-savings.

• Given the huge range of digital formats available – apps, projection, light shows, VR, AR – there will always be a format suitable for your budget, timescale and objectives.


Case Study: 400 Conejos.

As part of the Bahidora 2018 festival, Medusa Lab created a unique experience for Ache Producciones and its client: Mezcal 400 conejos.

Attendees received a complimentary drink of mezcal prior entering the dome, and once inside they discovered the mezcal making process through an immersive, colour-filled experience using animations and 360 video.

  • Medusa Lab - 400 Conejos - Audiovisual Artwork
  • Medusa Lab - 400 Conejos - Audiovisual Artist


Case Study: Pinata Tweet.

Piñata was a project made by MID for +Castro agency and the SAKE production company. The piñatas were installed as part of a collaboration with Trident Senses at Benicàssim International Festival.

The interactive piñatas are controlled via Twitter messages sent by the audience. Every tweet contained #TridentSensesPinata, which activated a device that inflated the piñata. As messages accumulated, eventually the piñata exploded over the audience!

  • MID - Pinata Tweets - Audiovisual Artists
  • MID - Pinata Tweets - Audiovisual Artwork



Audiovisual City and The Revels Office plan to now work together.

We aim to connect arts organisations with digital artists and commercial partners, creating inspirational and viable projects in a time of pandemic.

Together we will champion the skills, value and authenticity that digital art and digital tools can bring those looking to find new audiences and new revenue. Get in touch to discuss how these ideas could be applied to your own organisation – hello@therevelsoffice.co.uk

This article was written by Kate Rolfe from The Revels Office and Marco Savo from Audiovisual City with contributions from Hayley Cantor (Audiovisual City Creative Director, Multidisciplinary Graphic Designer and VJ), Sean Carroll (Business Improvement Project Manager), Nicola Casperson (Brand Marketing, Events and Place-Making Consultant), Steph Clarke (Digital Arts Producer), Marta Minguell Colomé (New Media Artist, VJ and Photographer), Amy O’Brien (Events Producer), and Mónica Rikic (New Media Artist). Collectively our experience includes roles at the National Gallery, Natural History Museum, Secret Cinema, Battersea Power Station, Westfields, and London’s Philharmonia Orchestra.

BUY US A COFFEE?BUY US A COFFEE?

The post What digital did next: Digital Arts and Social Distancing appeared first on Audiovisualcity.

ADAF 2020 – Call for Entries

Par : Marco Savo

DEADLINE: 1 June 2020

The 16th international festival for digital arts of Greece, Athens Digital Arts Festival (ADAF) is evolving and launching an ONLINE version.

Since the new era is here the international festival for digital arts in Greece, Athens Digital Arts Festival has decided that its 16th edition titled Technotribalism, will also be presented online.

ADAF ONLINE | Technotribalism will take place from the beginning of July till September and will be accessible to everyone through the internet.

Under this framework all audiovisual artists will be able to submit applications till the 1st of June, developing the Technotribalism idea to an online version.

The audiovisual event will host artworks from Video Art, Animation, VR (360 video), Performances, Web Art, Games, Digital Image, talks, workshops, ADAF Kids for Children & their Parents and Festivals of the world that are eligible to be presented digitally.

READ MORE AND APPLY

The post ADAF 2020 – Call for Entries appeared first on Audiovisualcity.

L.E.V. Festival

Par : Marco Savo
LEV-festival-Audiovisual-Events

Gijon, September 10 –  13 2020

L.E.V. (Laboratorio de Electrónica Visual) is a platform specialized in the production and promotion of electronic sound creations, and its relationship with visual arts. It was a European pioneer in this field, and since more than 13 years ago, it tries to converge the natural synergy between image and sound, and the new artistic trends, making special emphasis on live actions.

LEV develops the L.E.V. Festival (in Gijón) and specific, de-localized shows called LEVents. Through both proceedings, the platform reaches its goal: to provide an eclectic, panoramic vision of the current state of creation and all its connections, in an ever-evolving environment.

That is why LEV focuses its work both on international artists that are leaders in audiovisual creativity and local artists, both pioneers and new talents.

L.E.V. is a co-production between the Principado de Asturias Government, the Gijón City Council and LABoral Art and Industrial Creation Centre and it was designed and conceived by the Asturian collective Datatrón. The festival honors by its acronym to Lev Thermen (Russian scientist father of the present-day synthesizers).

Laboral, Camino de los Prados 121,

Gijon, Spain

Contact

Website

Facebook | Twitter | Vimeo | Instagram

The post L.E.V. Festival appeared first on Audiovisualcity.

Genius Loci Weimar

Par : Marco Savo

04 – 06 September 2020, Weimar

MAKE WALLS TALK!

The international GENIUS LOCI WEIMAR Festival for audiovisual projections was launched in 2012 as part of the ‘Weimar Summer’ initiative.

Optimally located in this city of poets, musicians and thinkers, as well as the birthplace of the Bauhaus movement, the festival has become an important cultural event for Thuringia, and is now in its ninth edition.

Through the technique of videomapping, Genius Loci Weimar redefines historical buildings and renders history and architecture as tangible for visitors. Every year, three new buildings and structures in and around the city of Weimar are chosen to become a part of the competition and festival.

The winning concept submissions, which must be in a medial narrative form, expressed at the highest technical level through the art of projection mapping, are developed and produced for one of the selected competition facades. Alongside the classic projections, an additional facade represents an interface with the media architecture in the form of a permanent installation. 

2020 is set to be a significant year for Germany, with jubilees and anniversaries that could hardly be more contrasting. The “Year of Music 2020” is celebrating Ludwig van Beethoven, Franz Liszt and numerous other composers whose great works could not have been created without the acclaim and support that they enjoyed in Germany.

For this year’s edition of the festival, GLW is expressly encouraging makers of short films, motion graphic artists and video and film artists of all backgrounds and genres to apply for the selected locations through the medium of their disparate visual aesthetics, animation techniques and narrative concepts.

MXPerience gUG / Goetheplatz 9b / D-99423 Weimar

Contact

Website

Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Vimeo

The post Genius Loci Weimar appeared first on Audiovisualcity.

❌