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Hier — 11 août 2020Video PRO

JAM capsule : mapping à la grande halle de la Villette à Paris

Par : LightPress
Lancé en juin 2020, JAM capsule est un dispositif scénographique monumental de forme oblongue. Il croise les talents pour collaborer sur une thématique.

À partir d’avant-hierVideo PRO

Freevox distribue RME

Par : admin

En plein redéploiement dans ses nouveaux locaux de Montevrain qui abriteront tout CSI Audiovisuel, Freevox ajoute une remarquable cerise sur le gâteau via le retour au bercail au 1er septembre de RME, la marque indispensable en audio numérique, et d'Alva. Lire la suite

L’article Freevox distribue RME est apparu en premier sur SoundLightUp..

Dynacord présente la MXE5 : matrice audio hautes performances

Dynacord introduit une nouvelle matrice audio numérique, la MXE5, premier modèle d’une gamme de matrices MXE. Elle dispose de fonctions de routage et de mixage, avec 12 entrées analogiques micro/ligne, 8 sorties niveau ligne et 24 canaux audio Dante. Lire la suite

L’article Dynacord présente la MXE5 : matrice audio hautes performances est apparu en premier sur SoundLightUp..

Instagram Reels, Finally a TikTok Competitor?

Instagram has sashayed into the scrollable video space with Reels. Could this be the final nail in the coffin for TikTok?

The Large-Format, Wide-Angle Cinematography of Wally Pfister

Let’s break down the high-concept, blockbuster cinematography of Academy Award winner Wally Pfister. To talk about acclaimed cinematographer Wally Pfister is to talk about his long-running creative ...

Nouveau VIO L1610, extrême puissance et qualité en 3 voies

Par : admin

Les italiens de dBTechnologies lancent VIO L1610, un line array compact à 3 voies actives équipé de deux woofers 10” et d'un moteur coaxial MF / LF entièrement néodyme, offrant 141 dB SPL Max avec des performances audio de premier ordre et d'une grande musicalité. Lire la suite

L’article Nouveau VIO L1610, extrême puissance et qualité en 3 voies est apparu en premier sur SoundLightUp..

Ciel nocturne de la 30ème Nuits des étoiles 2020

Préparez vos transats et éloignez-vous des éclairages. 30ème Nuits des étoiles, les 7, 8 et 9 août 2020. Conseils de l'AFA pour observer le ciel nocturne.

Header des Nuits des Etoiles 2020 © Plantu

To Green Screen Or Not To Green Screen?

Green screen can be handy for situations where you’re not able to shoot talent in a particular location.

Have you ever shot green screen? I have. A lot. Hundreds of different projects over the years. First of all, let’s get this out of the way, “green screen” has become a catch-all term that describes a process of shooting a subject against a colored backdrop that will electronically be replaced, usually through a postproduction process called compositing or keying, with another background. I’ve shot blue screen, red screen and white screen for luminance keying, but the color green is the most commonly used, so the process has come to be known as such. However, that term is a bit like Kleenex being used in place of tissue or “Coke or Pepsi” being used in place of soft drink.

This is my Westcott foldable 4×6-foot green screen set up for a shoot at the Fox lot with the showrunner of “The Simpsons.”

The Colors Of The Compositing Rainbow

Why would you want to use green or blue or red or any other color to key a subject over? Green screen is the most popular because it tends to work well with people’s skin tones since most people aren’t green unless they’re seasick or nauseated. Blue screen is more commonly used for scenes where there may be foliage or green wardrobe. Back in the days of film, blue screen tended to work better when film composites were brought into the compositing workflow pipeline. Why would you ever shoot red screen? I’ve shot red screen when shooting tropical plants that had a ton of green and blue in their natural coloring, but they had little to no red, so using a red backdrop allowed for easier keying.

There are also camera-related technical reasons why one might choose a particular color to key over. In RGB color space with most cameras, blue tends to have more noise than the green or red channels, so in that process, amplifying the blue channel can result in an increase in noise in the image. In the end, choosing the right color backdrop should be a collaboration between the cinematographer and the compositor based on what’s being shot and where, what’s being keyed, the colors of all of the objects in the scene that are shot live and several other factors.

Green screen of the rapper/actor Common
Green screen of the rapper/actor Common. We shot Common’s sequences with green screen because he couldn’t appear at the location where we were shooting the remainder of this section of the film. With higher-profile talent, if you want them to appear in your production, you have to often be flexible and come to them.

Green Screen Gets A Bad Rap

If we go back 10 or 20 years in production, shooting green/blue screen used to be much more difficult than it is in 2020. You had to really light any green or blue screen perfectly, making sure the lighting was even all of the way across the screen and at the right contrast ratio on the talent and subject versus the green/blue screen. You also had to make sure that there were no wrinkles or bunching on the physical screen itself. Fifteen years ago, keying software was good, but it wasn’t nearly as good as it is today, so generally, you just had to be much more careful about all of the details.

Your screen had to be lit nearly perfectly, and you had to mitigate the green or blue spill onto your talent from the green or blue screen itself, which required enough room on your set to physically separate the talent from the backdrop to cut down on the spill or eliminate it. Shooting and keying things like eyeglasses, where you could see the background through the edges and corners of the glasses, keying wispy blonde hair, cigarette smoke or fog effects were very difficult to pull off well. For these reasons, a good amount of shooters would end up with lousy keys with ragged edges, green edges, aliasing and other artifacts.

Cameras were often 8-bit recording in 4:2:0 color space, which meant that it was difficult to push a key or clean up a key because the bit space and color space were truncated compared to 10-bit 4:2:2. At the time, there was a huge price gap between low dollar SLRs and high dollar broadcast or digital cinema cameras that had 10-bit 4:2:2 recording capability. Today, there are fewer 8-bit 4:2:0 cameras on the market, and even low dollar cameras can record 10-bit 4:2:2 footage or even 10 or 12-bit RAW, making the recording much more robust for keying. Also, shooting at a higher resolution like 4K UHD for a 1080 project allows for more detail and increases the perceived color and detail resolution when downsampling a higher resolution image. There are so many factors in today’s cameras that allow for easier and better quality keys.

Bruce Miller
Bruce Miller is the showrunner for “The Handmaid’s Tale,” which shoots in Canada. We weren’t able to shoot Bruce’s interview on set, so we used green screen to shoot him in his LA production office, then composited him into background plates that were shot on set in Canada.

Why Shoot Green Screen?

The decision to shoot or not shoot green screen is an important one. I’ve shot a lot of green interviews where when speaking with the producer or director, the logical question is, “What will the background be?” Most of the time, the answer is, “We don’t know yet.” Not knowing what the background will be presents several challenges. What colors should the talent wear so they work with the color palette in the background? Which angle should they be shot from? Straight to camera or at an angle? What size should they be in the frame? How should they be lit?

That last point, in particular, has stung me in the past. If I’m lighting and shooting a green screen interview or host segment and I’m not told what the background will be and what the overall scene will look like, how can I know how to light the scene? The default is soft, frontal, flat light. If the background that the person will be composited into is lit in the same way, great—it should match. But what if the scene is high contrast with highly directional late afternoon light? In that case, the person that we shot with the flat, soft, even lighting will always look artificial and pasted into the scene because the lighting between the foreground and background doesn’t match in the least. The exception to this rule is when shooting talent that will be composited against graphics. Then, at least the graphics can be created to match the lighting of the person.   

Some reasons I’ve been told why producers want to shoot green screen:

  • Placing talent into an environment that doesn’t exist in reality (virtual sets, outer space story, etc.).
  • Placing talent into an environment that isn’t accessible because of travel costs.
  • When shooting talent in multiple locations that look and feel diverse, green screen can allow a unified and repeatable setting.
  • We want to place graphics, animation or stylized elements into a virtual background.
  • Bad weather in a location we want to shoot in, we can shoot clean plates later.
  • Political strife/war/factors where it would be too risky to bring crew and talent.
  • We want to place talent into archival footage shot in the past.
Actor Lauren Graham
I was going for photorealism with this shot of actor Lauren Graham on the set of her show “Gilmore Girls.” She was photographed in a loft in Hollywood, while the shot of the set was from 15 years ago at Warner Bros Studios in Burbank.

Photorealism

One of the best uses of green screen is for photorealistic composites. This is where great care is taken by the production to insert the green screen talent into a background in a way that’s seamless, realistic and carefully planned and executed. The results when this approach is taken can be breathtakingly realistic; you’d swear that the talent is in the location in real life. This can be accomplished with interviews, presentations, narrative, music videos—really in any format. In my experience, this is the most difficult green screen to pull off, but when you do, it’s the most gratifying too because the shot doesn’t scream “Green screen composite!” when viewed by the audience. It looks natural and doesn’t call attention to itself.

The reason why few productions try to tackle photorealistic compositing is that it takes a lot more planning, technique, skill and resources. You work backward in this process, shooting or gathering the background plates before shooting the talent. Then when you shoot the talent on set, you live composite the talent in front the of background so that the director, DP, gaffer, props, wardrobe and every other department can see the finished composite—at least a rough version of it. This way, all of the parameters—camera to subject distance, angles used, lens selection, focal length, exposure—can all be tweaked to perfection to make sure that the green screenshot matches the background perfectly.

This is even more important in shots where the background plate shot moves and the shot of the talent has to move accordingly. If you can sync the movement between the two elements perfectly as you shoot the talent shots, it really helps to sell the illusion. You are then getting into shot perspective matching, parallax correction and ensuring that the angles are in perfect sync. In my work, photorealism is always the goal when shooting green screen. It’s rarely realized because most of the projects I shoot on simply lack the budget and resources to do so. But on those rare occasions when I get to do this, it’s always a lot of fun and very gratifying when you nail it.

Comic Lisa Alvarado
This is comic Lisa Alvarado from a documentary that I shot. Does the shot feel different than other shots you’ve seen that are composites? Look at her hair, the wisps on the edge of her frame. Those can be difficult to get a perfect key on in composites, but not impossible. This shot is NOT a green screen composite—can you tell the difference?

The Alternatives

To me, as a DP, the alternative to green screen is always real locations or high-quality sets. Shooting the real-deal talent in real physical locations, well lit and nicely composed is always the ultimate. As DPs, directors and videographers, I’d always encourage you to push your clients and projects toward shooting talent in real locations whenever possible. Green screen can be an incredibly useful tool, but it can also be a compromise and a logistical and post-production challenge.

If you do have to shoot green screen, your best practice should also always be to push for pre-production time to shoot tests and, whenever possible, if the background plates are real locations, push to shoot those plates well before you shoot talent. Record your camera used, raster size, codec, frame rate, camera to subject distance, lens used, focal length, ƒ-stop and exactly where your lighting sources were positioned in frame. The more data you have from your background plate shoot, the more you can apply that data to replicate the exact same lighting and perspective on your talent so that whoever does the composites finds that they have two perfectly matching puzzle pieces.

The post To Green Screen Or Not To Green Screen? appeared first on HD Video Pro.

Sigma Announces 85mm F1.4 DG DN Prime Portrait Lens

Sigma’s new 85mm F1.4 DG DN prime lens

Earlier today, Sigma announced its latest prime lens for its Art series of lenses: The new Sigma 85mm F1.4 DG DN prime lens is a portrait prime lens designed for both L-Mount and E-Mount mirrorless-camera systems.

Sigma emphasized that the new prime will not only have very high optical quality, but it will be a lightweight lens as well, weighing in at around 22 oz. or about 1.4 lbs. Sigma also said its stepping motor has been optimized for use with both “phase detection AF and contrast AF,” providing a “smooth shooting experience only possible with a mirrorless camera, such as face/eye detection AF.”

Sigma’s new 85mm F1.4 DG DN prime lens

 

The Sigma 85mm F1.4 DG DN lens comes with on-board controls, including a focus-mode switch, AFL button and lock switch.

Other key specifications include :

  • An optical-lens design of 15 elements in 11 groups (with 5 SLDs and 1 aspherical lens);
  • On-board controls, such as a focus-mode switch, AFL button, a de-clickable aperture control (for the option of operating the aperture smoothly) and a lock switch;
  • 11 rounded diaphragm blades;
  • A minimum focusing distance of 33.5 inches;
  • And a dust- and splash-proof construction.

The new lens will ship later this month and be available for $1,199.

For more information, see the press release below:

Sigma’s new 85mm F1.4 DG DN prime lens on a Sony a-series full-frame mirrorless camera
Sigma’s new 85mm F1.4 DG DN prime lens

[[ press release ]]

SIGMA 85mm F1.4 DG DN Art – Redefining the Classic Lens

  1. The record-high performance worthy of the name of 85mm F1.4 | Art
  2. Lightweight & compact – A new perception of F1.4
  3. A full range of functionalities and excellent build quality

Mark a new chapter of the Art line F1.4 in the mirrorless age.

Large-diameter, unparalleled optical performance, compact and lightweight, and high-speed AF all in your hand.

The 85mm F1.4 DG DN | Art combines a clear and delicate rendering performance, which is requisite for portrait photography, with beautiful, rich bokeh effects only possible with lenses such as a large-diameter F1.4, at a level that will satisfy both professional and advanced amateur photographers. The focal length of 85mm and significant bokeh effect at F1.4 brightness allow the users’ subjects to stand out in a complementary fashion, which is one of the essences of taking portrait photography, so users can enjoy it to the fullest.

In addition to the fast and consistent AF response, the mirrorless-exclusive design of the 85mm F1.4 DG DN | Art has realized a lightweight and compact lens body that defies convention. And its small body is packed with a range of functionalities, including a dust- and splash-proof structure, supported by an excellent build quality.

The 85mm F1.4 DG DN | Art is SIGMA’s new “ultimate portrait lens” for the mirrorless age. And with it, SIGMA proposes a whole new world of possibilities provided by this “85mm F1.4 lens for everyday use,” thanks to the unprecedented level of portability, free from size- or weight-related limitations.

Key features

  1. The record-high performance worthy of the name of 85mm F1.4 | Art

85mm F1.4 is a specification almost synonymous with a portrait lens. With the Art line lenses, SIGMA pursues the highest optical performance possible and has devoted the latest optical design technologies, as well as the production technologies of the Aizu factory, SIGMA’s only production site, to the development of these lenses. The result is a detailed image critical for portrait photography that is achieved at a level that will satisfy both professional and advanced amateur photographers.

In addition to five SLD (Special Low Dispersion) elements and one aspherical lens, the 85mm F1.4 DG DN | Art has incorporated the latest high refractive index glass, which works to thoroughly correct aberrations that cannot be handled by the correction functionality on the camera side. With a particular emphasis given to the correction of axial chromatic aberration, users will enjoy sharp images with no color bleeding, all the way up to the maximum aperture of F1.4.

The high resolving power that covers the entire image from the center to the edges ensures sharpness of the area in focus, and coupled with the significant bokeh effect produced by the F-value of 1.4 brings out the users’ subject in an evocative way.

The numerous rounds of ray-trace simulation, as well as repeated real-world testing, have given the 85mm F1.4 DG DN | Art its ability to minimize ghosting, ensuring clear, sharp images even when shooting in backlit conditions.

With the ability to shoot from the maximum aperture of F1.4 without worrying about image quality, users can focus on the camera operations to realize their artistic expressions, such as the adjustment of exposure and depth of field. This new lens indeed delivers a level of optical performance truly worthy of the name of 85mm F1.4 Art.

  1. Lightweight & compact – A new perception of F1.4

The 85mm F1.4 DG DN | Art weighs 630g/ 22.2oz., with a filter size of 77mm and a body length of 94.1mm/ 3.7in.*. Designed exclusively for mirrorless cameras, it has a “large lens diameter and superb optical performance” and “a lightweight and compact body,” a combination which has long been difficult to achieve.

The AF motor system employs a stepping motor which is optimized for both phase detection AF and contrast AF. Not only does this provide a smooth shooting experience only possible with a mirrorless camera, such as face/eye detection AF, but it has also made the lens body itself much smaller, as the focus lens has been made small to better suit a stepping motor.

Furthermore, by making the most of the in-camera aberration correction functionalities, SIGMA was able to concentrate on the correction of aberration that could be handled by the optical system alone, which further contributed to making the lens smaller in size.

With such a lightweight and small body, users can now take out a large-diameter 85mm F1.4 lens for an everyday use such as taking snapshots. The 85mm F1.4 DG DN | Art invites users to enjoy photography in an unconventional way.

* For L-mount

  1. A full range of functionalities and an excellent build quality

This compact lens is packed with a range of functionalities that will satisfy both professional and advanced amateur photographers.

The 85mm F1.4 DG DN | Art has newly introduced an “Iris ring lock switch.” This prevents from unintended movement of the iris ring during shooting, allowing users to devote their attention to the creation of their image. The “Focus Mode Switch” on the lens body and the “AFL button*” that allows various functions to be assigned from a camera body will also assist users’ shooting.

In addition to the dust- and splash-proof structure, the lens uses materials such as aluminum and TSC (Thermally Stable Composite) where they are best suited, achieving a level of build quality that is worthy of the Art line. In addition to the durability of the body, the lens pursues quality in terms of how users “feel” as well, such as the smooth motion in which each ring or switch works, and the precise hand feeling. The 85mm F1.4 DG DN | Art helps ensure users a smooth shooting experience in every condition.

*Limited to compatible cameras.  Also, the functions depend on the camera.

Additional features

  • Lens construction: 15 elements in 11 groups, with 5 SLDs and 1 aspherical lens
  • Compatible with high-speed autofocus
  • Compatible with lens-based optical correction (*Only on camera models that support this functionality. Scope of correction varies depending on)
  • Iris ring
  • Iris ring click switch
  • Iris ring lock switch (*When turned ON at the position A, the iris ring is locked at A. When turned ON at a position other than A, it is locked within the range between the maximum to minimum apertures and will not engage at the position A.)
  • AFL button
  • Focus Mode Switch
  • Dust-and splash-proof
  • Hood with lock
  • Compatible with SIGMA USB DOCK UD-11 (sold separately / for L-Mount only)
  • Designed to minimize flare and ghosting
  • Every single lens undergoes SIGMA’s proprietary MTF measuring system “A1”
  • 11-blade rounded diaphragm
  • High-precision, durable brass bayonet mount
  • “Made in Japan” craftsmanship

To learn more about SIGMA’s craftsmanship, please visit SIGMA website at

https://www.sigma-global.com/en/lenses/

 

 

 

 

 

 

The post Sigma Announces 85mm F1.4 DG DN Prime Portrait Lens appeared first on HD Video Pro.

New Documentary Will Focus On Former White House Photographer Pete Souza

Poster for the upcoming documentary film on Photographer Pete Souza, “The Way I See It.”

It’s hard to believe that we have less than 90 days to go before the start of the 2020 US Presidential Election between President Donald Trump and the Democratic hopeful, Former Vice President Joe Biden. At this point, Biden may be leading in the polls, but anything can still happen. But a new film trailer released this week for a documentary film (by Focus Features) that will appear in movie theatres this September may certainly help Biden in his quest. That’s because the new documentary, “The Way I See It,” not only chronicles the work of photojournalist and photographer, Pete Souza, during his eight years with two different Presidents—Ronald Reagan (1981-1989) and Barack Obama (2009-2017)—as White House photographer, but also because it highlights Souza’s current role as a vehement critic of President Trump. (Souza was the official chief White House photographer under President Obama but had a more junior staff role during his eight years with President Reagan.)

 

Right from the get go, the trailer is provocative: “I know what happens in the oval office, and that’s what scares me,” are the first words you hear Souza say in this trailer for “The Way I See It,” which has been directed and produced by Dawn Porter. But just what exactly has scared Souza for the past three or so years? For starters, President Trump’s behavior as the 45th US President, and just how much he has differed in that role, in Souza’s opinion, with both President Obama and President Reagan.

For example, just a little over midway through the trailer (around the 1:30 mark) you hear Souza’s voice describing the election of President Obama and what that meant for the African American community, as powerful images shot by Souza are shown on screen. He says, “I thought, who is this man? How does he deal with crisis? Leadership, character, and empathy.” Then, the trailer cuts to Souza speaking on screen at a podium, and you hear him say, “Don’t you wish you had that now?,” referring to President Trump.

Screen shot from the trailer for the upcoming documentary film on Photographer Pete Souza, “The Way I See It.”

It’s intriguing to see Souza’s current role as political critic, seen by many on his Instagram feed, and how in some ways it harkens back to his photojournalism roots.

But that’s quite a different role than being a White House photographer, which is to cover the day-to-day activities and goings-on of the Commander in Chief and is more a combination of being documentary photographer as well as a commercial or public-relations type of photographer, instead of being a photojournalist. After all, if you’re a photographer employed by the sitting US President, you’re not going to be shooting images that take pot shots at his or her agenda.  

However, that’s not to say that White House photographers haven’t captured important moments in history. They certainly have: For example, a webpage from the White House website, during President Clinton’s second term, lists the following as examples of photos captured by White House photographers: President Lyndon Johnson signing the Civil Rights Act of 1964; President Richard Nixon’s final wave to his staff as he boarded Marine One after resigning as President; President Jimmy Carter signing the Camp David Peace Accords; President Ronald Reagan shaking hands with Mikhail Gorbachev; President George Bush meeting with American troops during Desert Storm; and President Clinton encouraging the famous handshake between the late Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Yasser Arafat.

One of the more photojournalistic-like images captured by a White House photographer was this one, now on Getty Images, by Barbara Kinney, which depicts five towering figures in the world of 1990s Middle East politics: (from left to right) Yitzhak Rabin, Hosni Mubarak, King Hussein, President Clinton and Yasser Arafat—who had stopped to adjust their ties prior to the signing of a peace accord at the White House in .

The President Clinton webpage goes on to describe the role of a White House photographer in the following way: “Whether photographing the President as he works in the Oval Office, enjoys quiet moments with his family, delivers a speech, or makes a crucial decision affecting our nation’s future, White House photographers have a front row seat to history in the making.”

However, those images, even the charming one by Barbara Kinney, are quite different than say how Photojournalist Doug Mills of the New York Times covers a US President, which you can see here, in this story, “Our White House Photographer on Covering President Trump.” Mills might cover the same events, such as President Trump’s State of the Union address in 2019. But a White House photographer would never shoot a photo like the one Mills caught of Nancy Pelosi making a “gesture” of a clap towards President Trump, which some of the right have taken to be disrespectful, which is why a White House photographer would probably not shoot that type of image.

You can find more on the role of a White House photographer on this Wikipedia page, which includes a list of the official photographers going back to President John F. Kennedy as well as some iconic images captured by those photographers. The Washingtonian also includes an intriguing article as well, and The New Yorker includes a short slide show of photos by White House photographers. Artsy has a story by Haley Weiss, which includes Souza’s spectacular photo of President Barack Obama bending over to let an African American boy, who was the son of a White House staff member, pat his head during a family visit to the Oval Office in 2009.

For more on Pete Souza, check out our Digital Photo Pro interview on him and read about how he captured his famous photo of President Obama and Vice President Biden, along with members of the national security team, as they received an update on the mission against Osama bin Laden in the Situation Room of the White House, May 1, 2011. You can also read about Souza and other political activists in our story on photographer KK Ottesen, who photographed Souza and others, in a story we posted earlier this year on KK Ottesen’s book, “Activist: Portraits of Courage”. Plus, check out my story from 2019 on Chris Buck and how he captures US Presidential portraits.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The post New Documentary Will Focus On Former White House Photographer Pete Souza appeared first on HD Video Pro.

How Your Choice of Podcast Music Can Make or Break Your Success

So, you’re ready to start a brand new podcast. You’ve got the idea, the team, you already recorded an episode. Now to the one key ingredient – ...

5 Reasons Why the URSA Mini Pro G2 Is a Documentary Workhorse

Blackmagic URSA Mini Pro 4.6K G2 is a versatile camera, good for nearly any workflow. Let's take a close look at the camera in a documentary environment.

GrandMA3 onPC command wing XT et Software version 1.2.0.2

Par : admin

Au croisement entre un Wing OnPC, un ordinateur et une console, la Wing XT est une nouvelle console MA Lighting accompagnée du soft en version 1.2.0.2. Lire la suite

L’article GrandMA3 onPC command wing XT et Software version 1.2.0.2 est apparu en premier sur SoundLightUp..

Nuits électriques, exposition autour du réverbère au Havre

Une exposition autour des représentations du paysage nocturne et du réverbère au Musée d’art moderne André Malraux du Havre. Nuits électriques.

Nuits électriques, exposition MuMa, Le Havre, France -Maxime Maufra, Féérie nocturne, Exposition universelle 1900 © C. Devleeschauwer

How to Render and Export in After Effects

When you're just getting started in After Effects, the program can be daunting. Here's a quick guide to exporting your project.

A Detailed Guide to Capturing Video Game Footage on a PC

Learn the basics of video game capture and start creating video game content. Check out what you need — a computer, free software, a video capture device.

Technology Tools for Online Education: New Book

Technology Tools for Online Education is a new book from the StreamGeek’s Chief Streaming Officer Paul Richards. The book comes at a time when educators from around the world are being asked to make a transition to online teaching. With the Fall 2020 semester coming up soon, the book offers educators a detailed look at ...

The post Technology Tools for Online Education: New Book appeared first on NAB Show News | 2020 NAB Show Media Partner and Producer of NAB Show LIVE. Broadcast Engineering News.

Crystal Vision makes creating picture-in-picture effects easier with M-PIP

Crystal Vision has released the industry’s first dedicated picture-in-picture device. Designed for IP or SDI playout applications that need one or two picture-in-picture boxes to be inset on the main program, the M-PIP allows two input flows to be sized and positioned in advance and then layered over either the third input flow or an ...

The post Crystal Vision makes creating picture-in-picture effects easier with M-PIP appeared first on NAB Show News | 2020 NAB Show Media Partner and Producer of NAB Show LIVE. Broadcast Engineering News.

OWNZONES RELEASES NEW FEATURES IN CONNECT

 OWNZONES Entertainment Technologies, the leading cloud-based video supply chain company, has announced today the release of three new features in its OWNZONES Connect™ platform to support customers and optimise user experience.   The new features, which include: Deep Analysis, Task Management, and Search Service, help Connect users efficiently organize, manage, and deliver content as well ...

The post OWNZONES RELEASES NEW FEATURES IN CONNECT appeared first on NAB Show News | 2020 NAB Show Media Partner and Producer of NAB Show LIVE. Broadcast Engineering News.

Pirate Subscription Services Now a Billion-Dollar U.S. Industry, Joint Digital Citizens Alliance-NAGRA Report Finds

Par : visitechpr

Washington, DC, August 6, 2020 – Digital Citizens Alliance and NAGRA jointly released today an investigative report showcasing how illegal piracy subscription services in the United States have grown into a billion-dollar industry that steals from creators, circumvents legitimate TV operators, and poses risks for consumers. “Money for Nothing” details how a sophisticated ecosystem of ...

The post Pirate Subscription Services Now a Billion-Dollar U.S. Industry, Joint Digital Citizens Alliance-NAGRA Report Finds appeared first on NAB Show News | 2020 NAB Show Media Partner and Producer of NAB Show LIVE. Broadcast Engineering News.

Grupo Express in Argentina enables Now Express OTT service with multi-DRM from NAGRA

Par : visitechpr

    NAGRA Multi-DRM to secure streaming services on consumer devices in partnership with BOLD MSS Hybrid cable and OTT solution enables rich set of features including linear and time-shifted viewing, interactive applications, and integration of third-party OTT apps Latest OTT deployment marks NAGRA’s expanding footprint in South America as leading provider of OTT and ...

The post Grupo Express in Argentina enables Now Express OTT service with multi-DRM from NAGRA appeared first on NAB Show News | 2020 NAB Show Media Partner and Producer of NAB Show LIVE. Broadcast Engineering News.

Brightline Expands LED SeriesONE Offerings for Studio Lights with Variable Color Temperature, RDM Control

Bridgeville, Penn. – Aug. 6, 2020 – Brightline, a leading manufacturer of energy efficient lighting systems, today announced it has upgraded its L1.2 and L1.4 LED SeriesONE studio light fixtures with variable color temperature and improved color rendering. Plus, the fixtures are now available with optional wireless DMX/RDM (remote device management) control that provides bidirectional ...

The post Brightline Expands LED SeriesONE Offerings for Studio Lights with Variable Color Temperature, RDM Control appeared first on NAB Show News | 2020 NAB Show Media Partner and Producer of NAB Show LIVE. Broadcast Engineering News.

Take 1 Improves Resource Scheduling with Xytech’s MediaPulse

Founded in 1995 and successfully navigating rapid expansions in service offerings and scale, the leading transcription metadata provider to the broadcast and media industries, Take 1 Transcription, turned to Xytech’s MediaPulse resource management software to manage its resource scheduling and internal workflow management. “With a growing portfolio of services across multiple regions, it was becoming ...

The post Take 1 Improves Resource Scheduling with Xytech’s MediaPulse appeared first on NAB Show News | 2020 NAB Show Media Partner and Producer of NAB Show LIVE. Broadcast Engineering News.

VEGAS Creative Software Launches VEGAS Pro 18; Unveils Extensive Plans for Cloud-Based Media Management and Collaborative Workflows

  VEGAS Creative Software (www.vegascreativesoftware.com) announced today a substantial new upgrade to VEGAS Pro, the Company’s signature video/audio editing, color grading and effects platform designed for professional editors, filmmakers, YouTubers and social media creators.    With this announcement, VEGAS Pro 18 adds a breadth of new features and major feature improvements to enhance workflow performance, ...

The post VEGAS Creative Software Launches VEGAS Pro 18; Unveils Extensive Plans for Cloud-Based Media Management and Collaborative Workflows appeared first on NAB Show News | 2020 NAB Show Media Partner and Producer of NAB Show LIVE. Broadcast Engineering News.

Digital Sprockets Relies on Cintel Scanner for Restoration of Classic Mexican Films

Fremont, CA – August 6, 2020 – Blackmagic Design today announced that its Cintel Scanner and DaVinci Resolve Studio are being used at film restoration and post production facility Digital Sprockets to restore a number of 35mm classic Mexican films from the 1940s, 1950s and 1980s. Digital Sprockets was founded in 1994 by Benjamin Fernández Rodriguez Maribona in ...

The post Digital Sprockets Relies on Cintel Scanner for Restoration of Classic Mexican Films appeared first on NAB Show News | 2020 NAB Show Media Partner and Producer of NAB Show LIVE. Broadcast Engineering News.

NiTRo Streamlines 8K Editing Workflows With AJA’s KUMO 3232-12G 12G-SDI Router

Par : News Feed

Tokyo-based leading expert in motion picture and multimedia broadcasting production NTV Technical Resources Inc (NiTRo) is a major technical provider to the Japanese broadcasting industry with a range of media services, including production engineering, post-production and broadcast operations and management. Following the launch of 8K broadcast channels in Japan in December 2018, NiTRo broke ground ...

The post NiTRo Streamlines 8K Editing Workflows With AJA’s KUMO 3232-12G 12G-SDI Router appeared first on NAB Show News | 2020 NAB Show Media Partner and Producer of NAB Show LIVE. Broadcast Engineering News.

ZIXI ANNOUNCES “ZIXI DELIVERS” VIRTUAL SHOWCASE IN SEPTEMBER

(August 5, 2020) Zixi, the industry leader for enabling dependable, live broadcast-quality video over any-IP, and award-winning architect of the Software-Defined Video Platform (SDVP), today announced that the company will be conducting Zixi Delivers, a showcase of webinars and virtual meetings, during the traditional IBC timeframe to engage with existing and prospective customers and partners. ...

The post ZIXI ANNOUNCES “ZIXI DELIVERS” VIRTUAL SHOWCASE IN SEPTEMBER appeared first on NAB Show News | 2020 NAB Show Media Partner and Producer of NAB Show LIVE. Broadcast Engineering News.

X2X Media Group Talks About Shooting RAW on a Budget

Let’s begin with production, where the image is captured. A good plan of attack is starting with best scenario for image capture. The capture might be camera RAW or a compressed format such as ProRes. In either case the image will be captured to a hard drive or mag, which will be downloaded to another ...

The post X2X Media Group Talks About Shooting RAW on a Budget appeared first on NAB Show News | 2020 NAB Show Media Partner and Producer of NAB Show LIVE. Broadcast Engineering News.

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